Saturday 29th of July 2017

hold fast to the things you believe to be true, even if they are complete baloney...

baloney

“No one has ever achieved anything significant without a chorus of critics standing on the sidelines explaining why it can’t be done,” the president said. “Nothing is easier — or more pathetic — than being a critic, because they’re people that can’t get the job done.”

Although the president’s approval rating fell to 36 percent in a Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday, he found warm support in Liberty’s football stadium.

“Whatever he chooses is probably best for the moment,” said Kristen Akers, 30, who doesn’t have an opinion on Comey’s firing and traveled to Liberty from northeastern North Carolina to see her younger sister graduate.

Her mother, Sondra Voorhees of Georgia, agreed: “He’s just very honest and to-the-point. He’s for everyone, not just one group of people.”

read more:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-to-liberty

see also: https://www.desmogblog.com/2017/05/12/people-dont-trust-scientific-resea...

 

sinning of gluttony because of the fear of trump?...

This week's political news has left me feeling panicky. The more I scroll Twitter, the more often I find myself craving my favorite snacks: chocolate chip cookies and canned Diet Coke.

I'm not alone in my attachment to specific foods for certain moods. Studies suggest that when we're sick, tired, sad, or stressed, we often eat in aims of feeling better. And given this year's political climate, some of us may be experiencing an extra strong hankering for a greasy slice of pepperoni pizza or fresh buttercream frosting. A Market Watch survey of food businesses on election night showed spikes in cupcakes, wine, pizza, and other junk food orders.

read more:

http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2017/05/go-comfort-foods-stress-e...

if you can't convince them, sue them...

 

USA Today drew up a list of lawsuits in which the Pussy Grabber and Commander-in-Chief has been involved.

In three decades, the tally is more than 4000 suits. “They range from skirmishes with casino patrons to million-dollar real estate suits to personal defamation lawsuits.”

The breakdown shows he was involved in 85 branding and trademark cases; 17 campaign cases; 1863 actions concerning his casinos, mostly chasing gamblers with bad debts; 208 contract disputes; 130 employment claims, the majority about underpayment at his resorts; 63 pieces of litigation about labour, personal injury and memberships related to his golf clubs; 190 cases involving the government and taxes; 14 defamation actions, seven each as a plaintiff and a defendant; 697 personal injury cases, of which he was a defendant in 696; 622 real estate actions, mostly brought by tenants and investors; plus 206 “other” cases.

According to the USA Today tally, he or his interests have been defendants about 1450 times and plaintiffs on roughly 1900 occasions, with bankruptcy and third-party actions 150 times.

Some of these actions are ongoing, including at least one for sexual harassment. He’d better be careful and avoid Bill Clinton’s mistake of lying under oath, which led to moves to impeach the former president.

Trump may be a disaster for the free world, but he’s a godsend to the legal profession. 

 

Tips and tattle: justinian@lawpress.com.au

This article was first published in the print edition of The Saturday Paper on May 13, 2017 as “Gadfly: A Mark of respect”. Subscribe to The Saturday Paper.

 

 

a footnote from a modest annabel...

 

I'm no expert in crisis identification. But when you get to the point at which your defence may rely on corroboration from the Kremlin, I suspect you're in the ball park, or at least the carpark of the ball park.

As the week's events unspooled, Trump appeared before a crowd of Coast Guard graduates in Connecticut to declare that "No politician in history, and I say this with great surety, has been treated worse or more unfairly."

No immediate response was available to the 45th president's bold assessment from presidents #16, #20, #25 or #35, for the excellent reason that all of them were shot and killed while in office.

BBC historian Dan Snow observed mildly: "Well, the Emperor Valerian was captured in battle, enslaved, used as a footstool, forced to drink molten gold and then skinned and stuffed."

Crisis? It's all about the context.

* Mr Trump's intoxicating co-ordinates on the matrix of personal power plotted against willingness-to-self-destruct-on-twitter, incidentally, are shared only by Rupert Murdoch. It is a great pity Mr Murdoch retired from Twitter on the day he married Jerry Hall, and we are thus permanently denied what could have been the most fabulous exchange of ill-conceived howlers in digital history.

Twitter: @annabelcrabb


read more:

http://www.smh.com.au/comment/is-trump-truly-in-crisis-or-is-it-just-a-media-beatup-20170519-gw8irc.html

 

"no expert in crisis identification?" Don't be too modest, Annabel. You perfectly know when a souffle (so sorry I could not place an accent on the "e" because my old keyboard is stuck in a state of  frozen option key) is stuffed or when the mayonnaise has curdled. May be we need at this stage a Kitchen Cabinet with Donald, cooking his speciality of "Deliverooed" Dorito-bacon spread on burnt French toast with a dob of Russian fish roe. Being slightly younger than Uncle Rupe, I never did quite take to Twitter, as I felt my spelling could show me as a useless twit. I don't need twitter to do that.

 

 

And in regard to #35, please read: 

 

nut country...

 

Meanwhile, in order to counter the spool of nuts, Donald is playing the goofy card with an unpredictable iron fist.