Saturday 16th of November 2019

on the uber-rich ...

on the uber-rich ...

Normal 0 false false false EN-AU X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Arial",sans-serif; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}

on the uber-rich …

At the age of 10, I was sent as a scholarship student to a boarding school for the uber-rich in Massachusetts. I lived among the wealthiest Americans for the next eight years. I listened to their prejudices and saw their cloying sense of entitlement. They insisted they were privileged and wealthy because they were smarter and more talented. They had a sneering disdain for those ranked below them in material and social status, even the merely rich. Most of the uber-rich lacked the capacity for empathy and compassion. They formed elite cliques that hazed, bullied and taunted any nonconformist who defied or did not fit into their self-adulatory universe.

It was impossible to build a friendship with most of the sons of the uber-rich. Friendship for them was defined by “what’s in it for me?” They were surrounded from the moment they came out of the womb by people catering to their desires and needs. They were incapable of reaching out to others in distress - whatever petty whim or problem they had at the moment dominated their universe and took precedence over the suffering of others, even those within their own families. They knew only how to take. They could not give. They were deformed and deeply unhappy people in the grip of an unquenchable narcissism.

Read more … http://www.begavalleyshireratepayers.asn.au/files/on-the-uber-rich---23.10.2018.pdf

flaunt your goodies...

Crazy rich Asians are posting photos of themselves face down and surrounded by luxury goods in a new trend sweeping social media.

The Mandarin hashtag, which literally translates to “show off fake fall” in English, has taken Chinese social media by storm. Over one million posts with the hashtag have appeared on Weibo, China’s equivalent to Facebook, showing staged photos posing on the ground with luxe objects.

The online craze started in Russia, then called the “falling stars” challenge, with more than 100,000 posts on Instagram. It usually involved someone tumbling out of a vehicle and “accidentally” flashing people with their money.

As the fad’s popularity skyrocketed online, social media users are now calling it the “flaunt your wealth challenge.”

 

Read more:

https://nypost.com/2018/10/24/rich-kids-found-another-ridiculous-way-to-...