Friday 21st of June 2019

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by Gus Leonisky on Tue, 2019-06-18 15:02

Is Bernie Sanders selling socialism? Or is he just making a clear case for a government that actually works for the people? A panel discussion with Norman Solomon and Kamau Franklin, with Jacqueline Luqman as host

 

See more:

https://therealnews.com/stories/bernie-sanders-vision-of-democratic-socialism-makes-both-sides-nervous

 

 

 

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by Gus Leonisky on Tue, 2019-06-18 13:23

Last week, United Kingdom Home Secretary Sajid Javid signed the extradition request from the United States to hand over WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who is charged with 18 counts of violating the Espionage Act of 1917. The final decision on the extradition request now rests with British courts. The first extradition hearing was scheduled for last Friday, but Assange's poor health made it impossible for him to attend in person, so he appeared remotely via video.

“This case is an outrageous affront to journalistic protections,” Assange's lawyer Jennifer Robinson said after the court decision. “This indictment will place a chilling impact and will affect journalists and publishers everywhere all over the world by the U.S. seeking to extradite and prosecute a publisher outside of the U.S. who is not a U.S. citizen for having published truthful information about the United States: evidence of war crimes, human rights abuse, and corruption the world over,” 

Assange spent seven years in Ecuador's embassy in London, where he had received asylum under then-President Rafael Correa. Ecuador's current President Lenin Moreno suspended Assange’s asylum and allowed British police to enter the embassy and arrest him in April. All additional hearings surrounding Assange’s case have been suspended until February of next year. Assange remains in a maximum security prison in Belmarsh.

Journalist and documentary filmmaker John Pilger’s described Assange's extradition hearing last week to The Real News Network’s Greg Wilpert: “[Assange] didn't have an opportunity to defend himself. And that's the first major issue here. He doesn't even have a computer. He doesn't have access to documents. He's kept, a lot of the time, isolated, although he's in a hospital ward,” Pilger said. “For instance, he questioned the prosecutor, [the] lawyer appearing on behalf of the U.S. government, and said that there is one charge here that is unquestionably false—even the U.S. admits that there was no hacking,”

When Assange tried to defend himself, Pilger explained, the judge, chief magistrate Emma Arbuthnot “virtually shut him up”—a harbinger of how Assange's legal case will play out.

“I don't think these initial extradition hearings will be fair at all, no, because this one last Friday, for the reasons I've outlined, was not fair. He’s not allowed to defend himself. He's not given access to a computer so that he can access the documents and files that he needs. I think where it will change is if the lower court, the magistrate's court that is dealing with it now and will deal with it over the next almost nine, ten months, if they decide to extradite Julian Assange, his lawyers will appeal. And it will go up to the High Court,” Pilger said. “And I think it's there in the High Court where he may well—I say 'may'—get justice. That's a cautiously optimistic view. But I think he's he's most likely to get it there. He certainly won't get it the United States. There's no indication of that.”


GREG WILPERT: It’s The Real News Network, and I’m Greg Wilpert in Baltimore.

Last week, UK Home Secretary Sajid Javid gleefully signed the extradition request from the U.S. to hand over WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. The U.S. is seeking Assange’s extradition because it has charged him on 18 counts of having violated the Espionage Act of 1917. The final decision on the extradition request now rests with British courts. The first extradition hearing was scheduled for last Friday, but Assange’s poor health made it impossible for him to attend in person, and so he appeared remotely via video link. Assange has already spent seven years in a small room in Ecuador’s embassy in London, where he had received asylum under then-President Rafael Correa. However, Ecuador’s current President Lenin Moreno decided to suspend his asylum and allowed British police to enter the embassy and arrest him last April.

All additional hearings have now been suspended until February of next year. Meanwhile, Assange remains in a maximum security prison in Belmarsh, where he is serving a 50-week sentence for having skipped bail. Assange’s lawyer Jennifer Robinson responded to the court decision as follows.

JENNIFER ROBINSON: As we heard inside the court, this case is an outrageous affront to journalistic protections. This indictment will place a chilling impact and will affect journalists and publishers everywhere all over the world. by the U.S. seeking to extradite and prosecute a publisher outside of the U.S. who is not a U.S. citizen for having published truthful information about the United States: evidence of war crimes, human rights abuse, and corruption the world over.

GREG WILPERT: We’re now joined by John Pilger, who has been observing the Assange case very closely, and who was present at the extradition hearing last Friday. John is an award-winning journalist and documentary filmmaker, and his most recent film is called The Coming War in China. Thanks for joining us today, John.

JOHN PILGER: You’re welcome.

GREG WILPERT: So what was the hearing last Friday like? Did Assange have an opportunity to actually defend himself and to make his case? And what was the reaction from the U.S. lawyers and the judges there?

JOHN PILGER: No, he didn’t have an opportunity to defend himself. And that’s the first major issue here. He doesn’t even have a computer. He doesn’t have access to documents. He’s kept, a lot of the time, isolated, although he’s in a hospital ward. So, for instance, he questioned the prosecutor, lawyer appearing on behalf of the U.S. government, and said that there is one charge here that is unquestionably false. Even the U.S. admits that there was no hacking. You mentioned at the beginning, Greg, there were 18 charges of espionage. In fact, one of these charges is hacking. That doesn’t even relate to him. It shows how shambolic the whole thing is. As far as the espionage charges, none of those, none of those are crimes under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

So when he tried to defend himself on this one charge that doesn’t even apply to him, the judge, Emma Arbuthnot, virtually shut him up. And that was really the end of it. It was meant to be a brief hearing in which future dates for the case were agreed. But you got a real sense, a real flavor, of, if not a done deal, then a very, very long uphill road for Julian Assange and his lawyers.

GREG WILPERT: So why do you think Home Secretary Sajid Javid was so eager to extradite Assange? And given this eagerness, how likely do you think that these extradition hearings against Assange will be fair?

JOHN PILGER: It’s very difficult to know. I don’t think these initial extradition hearings will be fair at all, no, because the first–this one last Friday, for the reasons I’ve outlined, was not fair. He can’t–he’s not allowed to defend himself. He’s not given access to a computer so that he can–so that he can access the documents and files that he needs. I think where it will change is if the lower court, the magistrate’s court that is dealing with it now and will deal with it over the next almost nine, ten months, if they decide to extradite Julian Assange, his lawyers will appeal. And it will go up to the High Court. And if necessary, eventually, to the Supreme Court here in the UK. And I think it’s there in the High Court where he may well–I say ‘may’–get justice. That’s a cautiously optimistic view. But I think he’s he’s most likely to get it there. He certainly won’t get it the United States. There’s no indication of that.

GREG WILPERT: Actually, I’ve heard also that there was a similar case not too long ago in which the extradition hearings took almost three years. But eventually the Supreme Court did prevent the extradition from the UK to the U.S. But turning to another issue, Assange, just like yourself, is an Australian citizen. Has the Australian government done anything to protect Assange, as far as you know?

JOHN PILGER: No. It’s a very short answer to that, Greg. They’ve done absolutely nothing. And in fact, they’ve done the converse. It was Prime Minister Julia Gillard in 2011 who decided that WikiLeaks had performed a criminal act, and the Australian Federal Police had pointed out to Prime Minister Gillard that there was no such crime. So they were eager to help convict Julian Assange of these concocted crimes, and have fully cooperated, I would say colluded, with the U.S. in seeing this case get to the stage it has now.

GREG WILPERT: Of course, one of the big issues–and we’ve actually done interviews with Daniel Ellsberg and others–is the topic of what effect this will have on freedom of the press. But in an article you wrote after Assange’s arrest, you suggested that another angle that people should pay attention to is to look at what other potential war criminals have done, such as Tony Blair, and that we should imagine his extradition to the International Criminal Court in the Hague. Talk about this comparison between Assange’s alleged crimes, and those of Tony Blair, for example.

GREG WILPERT: Well, where Julian Assange was on Friday, Friday morning, at the Westminster Court in Marylebone in London, is about a 20-minute cab drive to a very small part of London called Connaught square. And that’s where Tony Blair has a very palatial residence, where he lives on the basis of all his–the millions that he’s accumulated since he left 10 Downing Street. He advises various dictatorships and does other so-called consultancy work. But of course Blair is most remembered in this country and around the world for his collusion with George W. Bush in the invasion of Iraq. And the invasion of Iraq, it is now generally agreed by the scholarship, I think that at least a million people died as a direct result, and at least four million refugees fled that country as a result of that invasion.

So under the Nuremberg standard, that was–that would be regarded as a paramount crime. Blair has not been charged, and there’s no suggestion that Blair would be charged, and it’s very unlikely that he will be charged. So there is your comparison. Whereas Julian Assange is a journalist and publisher. He has committed no crime. He has published classified documents. And that’s an act protected, as I say, under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. And if he is convicted, then all his collaborators on the New York Times, the Guardian, Der Spiegel, El Pais, Sydney Morning Herald, and numerous other newspapers and news organizations around the world will also be guilty. But most important, in the future it will–it sends a very clear message that if journalists do their job and tell their readers and viewers and listeners what governments do behind their backs in their name, if they do their job, then they’re very likely to be prosecuted in the same way.

It is probably the most–well, it is most certainly the most important case in my career as a journalist. It presents the most, the gravest threat to press freedom which I can remember.

GREG WILPERT: OK. Well, unfortunately we’re going to leave it there for now. I was speaking to John Pilger, award-winning journalist and documentary filmmaker. Thanks again, John, for having joined us today.

JOHN PILGER: You’re welcome, Greg.

GREG WILPERT: And thank you for joining The Real News Network.

 

Read more:

https://therealnews.com/stories/john-pilger-extradition-process-a-very-long-uphill-road-for-assange

by Gus Leonisky on Tue, 2019-06-18 13:17

It has been my personal record that Australia "has been at a cross-road" (cliché) about every six months (if not less) for the last 49 years. So is the entire planet. This is when social planning becomes like weather predicting... Crap. On the other hand, should you be predicting global warming, then you would be on the money: so, on your bicycles, cobbers.

 

 

Image at top by Norman Lindsay, for the 1914 war effort...

by Gus Leonisky on Tue, 2019-06-18 12:18

oldtoon

Old Toon from The New Yorker circa 1950?

At this stage, we cannot establish a connection between Elizabeth Warren's (née Herring) first husband and Earl Warren (the subject of the cartoon) — the American politician and jurist who served as the 14th Chief Justice of the United States (1953–1969) and earlier as the 30th Governor of California (1943–1953). Earl Warren was the last Chief Justice to be elected rather than be chosen, thus "could be impeached".

We know that Elizabeth Warren wants to impeach Donald Trump...

 

Pundits rolled their eyes on New Year's Eve when Elizabeth Warren, a Democratic US senator from Massachusetts, announced she had taken the first steps to run for president.

She was too schoolmarmish, too serious in her focus on policy over personality, especially in the face of bombast from President Donald Trump.

Her decision to take a DNA test to find out whether she had Native American ancestry became a blunder when tribe leaders denounced her.

Conventional wisdom declared that Ms Warren was destined to be a back-of-the-pack candidate, overshadowed by alpha males such as Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders, and far less interesting than people of colour such as Cory Booker, Kamala Harris and Julian Castro.

And, if you wanted a wonk, there was Pete Buttigieg, the multilingual Harvard and Oxford-educated mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who had the added credentials of being gay and a military veteran.

Nevertheless, to quote the expression used about her tactics on the Senate floor, she persisted.

And now, Senator Warren is rising to the top of the presidential pack, seemingly by being herself.

In recent weeks, she's scored the kind of achievements that scorekeepers track in successful candidates.

There have been profiles in Time Magazine and The New Yorker.

The latter declared:

"On many economic issues, Warren has been remarkably prescient. She has spent decades warning Americans about the pernicious effects of income inequality, predatory corporations, and consumer debt, and about the failures of our financial system — issues that are at the heart of the 2020 Presidential campaign".

The profile went on:

"Now, as one of 23 candidates seeking to become the Democratic nominee for President, Warren is betting that the energy behind her ideas can appeal to enough swing-state voters to get her into office".

 

Read more:

 

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-18/elizabeth-warren-rivalling-bernie-sanders-joe-biden-2020-race/11215394

 

Sen. Elizabeth Warren's ex-husband co-founded a DNA testing company and wrote one of the first computer codes for making genetic comparisons. 

Jim Warren's career involved him in the kinds of genetic testing that Elizabeth Warren controversially invoked this month to prove that she had Native American ancestry. 

One of the two other co-founders of his testing company, FamilyTreeDNA, has worked with Carlos Bustamante, the Stanford University geneticist who administered a DNA test at Elizabeth Warren's request. 

Bustamante, a Stanford University geneticist, conducted the test, which Elizabeth Warren used to respond to President Trump's "Pocahontas" taunt and his mockery of her previous claim to be a Native American while a professor at Harvard Law School in the 1990s. Warren's roll-out of the test results was widely seen as a sign that she is running for president in 2020. 

Rather than using a commercial service to conduct her DNA test, Warren hired Bustamante, 43, who appears in the video explaining the test and in a scene in which the Massachusetts senator telephones his office and asks to speak with him. Warren received considerable criticism for the test, which found that her Native American heritage stretch back six to 10 generations, making her between 1/64th and 1/1024th Native American.

 

Read more:

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/congress/elizabeth-warrens-ex-husband-founded-dna-testing-company

by Gus Leonisky on Tue, 2019-06-18 11:40

if you are

 

 

 

SO, WHAT ARE THE TENETS OF BEING A LIBERAL?

 

1. Opposition to Labor. Labor is bad. 

Labor is in bed with the unions and unions are bad. They demand better working conditions for all workers, including the illegal ones we, Liberal bosses, use on the sly... The socialist union mugs! As if we were made of honey! As if money grew on the work of workers, which it does but that beside the point. If there were no bosses with whips and sticks, workers would slack off... Workers would be poorer with nothing to do if we did not use them as slaves. Better conditions? Want a yacht in the Caribbeans as well? You're lucky to get food on the table. And when you get the sack, you don't deserve the dole... Money for nothing? you've got to be kidding!

 

2. Charity before social justice. 

Giving is good as long as it's tax deductible. Tax is not tax deductible... Charitable enterprises are good. They range from churches to medical supplies. All are designed to give that warm feeling of helping someone in need, as long as it's tax deductible and measured as not to impinge on the pocket money, stitched aside for those holidays in the Caribbeans. But charity should not help people help themselves too much, otherwise charity would tragically become obsolete... Mind you there is an endless supply of charitable causes to choose from.

 

3. Lower taxes, voluntary contribution or no tax if possible. 

Not giving (much) tax is good. Sharing equitably is bad. Taxes tend to slug the rich. Liberals are on the rich side of the fence, in general and get slugged... Hum... Tax deductions are good as they bring us rich people down to the same tax bracket level as the poor mugs who work their arse off. Anyway, tax should be replaced by charity — a measured discreet voluntary donation to Liberal mates, such as developers, entrepreneurs, those good people with the know how to build concrete roads and tall buildings with views, pushing the poor people — who are in the way of inevitable progress — out.

 

5. Freedom. 

Freedom to be ensnared by religious beliefs as long as these are Christian beliefs. Other beliefs might be tolerated but as long as they understand who's boss. Faith in the Christian god is good and gives the freedom to sin and be contrite, without the civil court bit —especially for priests. Freedom is highly valued and should be imposed on anyone who does not have the same rigourous ideal of freedom, unless they are powerful and have oil. These are our despotic Muslim friends. Saddam on the other hand was weak (that's why we lied he was strong, but we knew he was weak — otherwise we wouldn't have attacked him if he was strong) and had oil. A weak and poor country without freedom nor oil under a tyrant is basically uninteresting unless it can provide real estate for a military base... Thus the tyrant is pragmatically our friend because we need him to keep the restless natives from which we're acquiring the real estate, quiet or dead — which ever comes first. They would have died from malaria or from an unspeakable disease anyway. Some of us don't like bits of genitalia being cut of in the name of religious practice — not in this country anyway. Our friend the despots can do what they like though — including torture or kill the opposition — as long as we have the military base. We don't practice torture — unless we have to.

In this framework free enterprise is on a pedestal. Free enterprise means that one can sell snake oil as long as one can find customers for snake oil. Stealing is not recommended in the open especially since the Switzerland haven has become regulatory cumbersome. Competition is good as long as competitors can be shot down in a "friendly" way. Workers of course should not enjoy freedom otherwise they slack off. The Mafia is terrible especially when it competes on our exclusive turfs... Free market is good as long as customers pay for it...

 

6. War on everything that is not "liberal". 

Biffo is good. War is brilliant. Peace tends to limit the scope of selling snake oil and other goods. War is excellent as it tends to demand replacement goods by the sheer nature of explosion and demolition of supplies. On another front, the liberal arts ended with Picasso, thank goodness. Art has nothing to do with philosophy. Art is the way to buy and sell exclusive masterpieces to other rich people who want what you have, for twice as much as you paid for, usually in the millions but they don't really care since they have twice as many millions. 

 

7. Money before equity. 

Greed is good. If the stock market and the money market are roaring along it's the Liberals' doing. If the stock market and the money market take the plunge it's Labor's fault. And this can be seen clearly by the way Labor handled the economy during the last financial crisis. Giving money to the people rather than to the banks stank of socialism! Let the market decide that the poor shall stay poor, unemployed and debt ridden, while the government coffers should be filling up with money gouged from the sweat and tears of the rest of the still-at-work flogged workers. Banks are good and should they become insolvent because of Liberal bosses bonuses, they should be propped up by government before the people (who should never be propped up). Any Labor projects that is 99 per cent successful shall be declared a failure. Any Liberal project that is 70 per cent a failure shall be deemed a success. 

 

8. Exploitation of resources. Plundering is good. 

The earth belongs to the humans "race" (meaning the white fellows). Contrary to scientific beliefs, humans are not a species but we are the children of god (angels without wings) — a god who in his great wisdom gave the express order to breed and plunder as fast as possible the given goodies: the trees, the dirt, the minerals of the known universe — but especially, from this flat earth. Global warming is a hoax perpetrated by the communists to take over the world and stop us exploiting the cheap fuels... 99 per cent of the scientists are wrong. Our two shock jocks such as Alan Jones and Andrew Bolt are totally right on this subject. God did not write anything about global warming in the bible, thus it does not exist.

 

9. Regal born to rule privilege. 

Royalty is good. Although there are some traitors in the Liberal ranks who believe a republic could be better than a Queen in another country ruling over us, they still believe that the Liberals should be in charge of the loot due to breeding privileges. Most Liberals are royalists though. Support for the Anglican Queen or the future King (a bit too greenie for comfort though) is the optimum of undivided loyalty. We love the crumbs, such as lordships and honour badges to be collected on the way to brown-nosing privileges for having given charitably to our mates the developers. Gold, god and the Queen give the Liberals the exclusive right to rule this country. 

 

10. Never EVER compromise on anything, especially an ETS, or admit being wrong... Being wrong with elegant hypocrisy is an excellent way to be right. The freedom to be wrong is to be cherished, but the Liberals are always right, even if we're wrong. Labor is always wrong.

 

From: http://www.yourdemocracy.net.au/drupal/node/10145

 

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by Gus Leonisky on Tue, 2019-06-18 11:13

Acting US defense secretary Patrick Shanahan announced on Monday the deployment of about 1,000 additional troops to the Middle East for what he said were “defensive purposes”, citing concerns about a threat from Iran.

“The recent Iranian attacks validate the reliable, credible intelligence we have received on hostile behavior by Iranian forces and their proxy groups that threaten United States personnel and interests across the region,” Shanahan said in a statement.

Reuters first reported plans to send US additional troops to the Middle East earlier on Monday.

 

Read more:

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/jun/17/us-to-send-1000-additional-troops-to-the-middle-east-citing-hostile-behavior

 

 

Read from top.

 

One can smell the fakery 5000 miles away...

by Gus Leonisky on Tue, 2019-06-18 10:27

Boris Johnson is charging towards Downing Street in a campaign based on saying nothing — and it's working.

Key points:

  • Australian spin doctor Lynton Crosby, known as the "Wizard of Oz" is believed to be advising Boris Johnson's campaign
  • Mr Johnson infuriated his No 10 rivals by refusing to take part in a live television debate
  • He has a history of making gaffes, including comparing Muslim women who wear veils as "letter boxes"

 

Dubbed the 'submarine' strategy, the Conservative leadership is Mr Johnson's to lose, so remaining under the radar is a safety net. Say nothing and you'll say nothing wrong.

Behind the scenes the political strategy is being credited to non-other than Australia's own Lynton Crosby, the spin doctor dubbed the "Wizard of Oz".

While he's not officially onboard Mr Johnson's campaign, he is reportedly advising from the sidelines.

Known for so-called wedge politics, where divisive debate on issues like asylum seekers dominate, he helped former PM John Howard in his four election wins before shifting his attention to the UK.

He helped Mr Johnson win two terms as London Mayor and assisted in securing David Cameron's election victory in 2015.

Sir Lynton, who was knighted for his work in politics, also advised Theresa May during the disastrous 2017 snap election, which ended with the Conservatives losing their majority - one of the few blemishes on his CV.

It has been said that Mr Johnson has been dreaming of becoming PM since a young age, and it was Sir Lynton that helped coordinate his failed run during the 2016 Conservative leadership race, where Boris-backer and current leadership rival Michael Gove backflipped and instead decided to run himself.

They both ultimately failed and Mrs May was elected leader unopposed.

 

Read more:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-18/boris-johnson-under-wraps-during-conservative-leadership-contest/11218638

 

See also: a perfectly born bullshitter for the next bullshitocracy... 

by Gus Leonisky on Tue, 2019-06-18 10:02

 


This poem is for those who are about to lose their life for no other reason that someone decided so, when the social privileges changed hands, in revolutions. This is "The Young Captive" by André Chénier, a poem about a young girl in prison sadly awaiting the guillotine for no other reason she was born to noble parents...


Translation/adaptation by Jules Letambour.




The Young Captive


"The budding grain ripens for the caring scythe;

Without fear of the press, the rootstock all summer

Drinks the sweet gifts of daybreak;

And me, as beautiful as it is, and so young alike,

Whatever the present hour brings, trouble or bother,

I do not want to die yet.



"A stoic with dry eyes would fly off to kiss death,

I am crying in hope; to the dark northern breath

I bend and then lift my head.

If there are bitter days, some are so sweet!

Alas! what honey has never been too neat?

What sea has no hurricane?




"This passioned illusion dwells in my heart.

From a prison the walls which weigh in vain,

I have wings and hope bright;

Escaping from the clutches of the cruel fowler,

More alive, more happy, into the fields of the sky

Philomèlea sings and alights.



"Is it for me to die? Quiet I fall asleep,

And quiet I watch, as neither my wait, to remorse,

Neither my sleep, are prey.

I welcome daylight that laughs at me from all sides;

On defeated foreheads my presence in this place

brings most joys, so fairly.



'My beautiful journey is so far from its end!

I'm leaving, and of all the trees that line the way

I barely saw the first few.

At the banquet of life barely begun,

For a lonely moment my lips have kissed

The cup of life in my hand.



"I am only at spring, I want to see the harvest;

And like the sun, from season to season next,

I want to finish my destiny.

Bright on my stem, the pride of the garden,

I have only seen the morning lights burn:

I want to finish the day.



"O death! you can wait; move away, go away;

Go and comfort the hearts that shame and fear,

And despair have devoured.

For me, the flowering bush is a welcoming refuge,

With kisses of love, and Muses inspired concerts;

I do not want to die yet!"




Sad and so captive, my lyre however

Woke up, listening to the laments, that voice,

These wishes of a young captive;

And shaking the burden of my languid days,

To the sweet laws of verses I wrote the accents

From her kind and naive lips.



These songs, from my prison, harmonious witnesses

Will make some lover studious dreams

To find who was this beauty:

Serenity decorating her forehead and her pleas,

And, like her, will be afraid to see their days come to end,

Their dying days near her.




André Chénier
by Gus Leonisky on Tue, 2019-06-18 07:26

The Morrison government has been challenged by the European Union and by China about whether it can meet its Paris commitments given rising emissions, and about growing pollution from vehicles, ahead of a progress meeting about climate commitments in Bonn next week.

Nineteen countries, including Australia, will gather in Bonn on 24 and 25 Junefor a multilateral assessment of progress made under international climate commitments, and ahead of that session countries have submitted a range of questions about the performance of signatories in meeting their climate targets.

As well as questions about rising emissions, the EU and Canada have also queried the Morrison government’s decision to use carry-over credits from the Kyoto protocol in its latest carbon budget.

The Coalition is counting a 367 megatonne abatement from carry-over credits (an accounting system that allows countries to count carbon credits from exceeding their targets under the soon-to-be-obsolete Kyoto protocol periods against their Paris commitment for 2030) to help meet Australia’s 2030 target.

The EU in its questions to Australia points out that net emissions will grow during the period 2013 to 2020 and notes “Australia is also increasing coalmining, in particular for export”.

It has asked whether Australia considers its emissions profile, which has seen pollution rise since the repeal of the carbon price, to be “on a structural path of decrease in line with its commitments”. It has also flagged fossil fuel exports and asked whether they are sustainable “in the context of Paris agreement”.

 

Read more:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jun/18/australia-quizzed-by-eu-and-china-on-whether-it-can-meet-2030-paris-climate-target

 

Note that most of Australia's Kyoto "carbon credits" were gained by Labor's "price on carbon policy" that moronic Tony Abbott called "the carbon tax" and repealed with the help of two-faced Clive Palmer... It was effective, unlike the expensive rubbish used by the Scummo government to fiddle the books.

 

Read from top.

 

See also:

'Alan Jones is wrong': Climate scientist tells politician-free Q&A

It was an evidence-based show, with no panellists invited to contest the notion that the world is round.

 

and:

http://www.yourdemocracy.net.au/drupal/node/33287

by Gus Leonisky on Tue, 2019-06-18 07:07

A chemical used to control pests in agricultural crops and termites in buildings has been blamed for the death of up to 10 million bees in southern New South Wales.

Key points:

  • A bee poisoning is estimated to have cost apiarists up to $170,000, with fears it could impact horticultural producers
  • An EPA investigation found the presence of Fipronil was likely to have contributed to the deaths
  • A commercial beekeeper says bee poisonings are becoming more common, especially for those operating in agricultural areas

 

Five apiarists lost the bees from 340 hives in April after they were poisoned by the pesticide Fipronil near Griffith.

Ian Carter, a small-scale commercial apiarist providing pollination services to local farmers, said his business had been devastated by the loss of three quarters of his hives.

"One drop of this poison from one bee that takes it back to the hive will then kill the whole hive," Mr Carter said.

 

Read more:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-18/apiarist-calls-for-fipronil-ban-after-bees-die/11216968

 

 

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