Saturday 24th of August 2019

Recent Comments

by Gus Leonisky on Fri, 2005-10-28 09:58
Extract from the article mentioned: ___________________________________ """""US nuke policy rethink prompts physicist protest Boffins against the bomb By Lucy Sherriff Published Wednesday 26th October 2005 15:58 GMT Almost 500 physicists in the US have signed a petition protesting a proposed change in government policy that would allow the US to use nuclear weapons against non-nuclear countries. The proposed change in policy was reported in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. The petition's instigators, both professors of physics at The University of California, San Diego, said that they felt an obligation to take a stand because of the role physics played in developing the weapons in the first place. The change in policy would undermine the long-standing nuclear non-proliferation treaty, professors Jorge Hirsch and Kim Griest argue in the petition. They write: The underlying principle of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is that in exchange for other countries forgoing the development of nuclear weapons, the nuclear weapon states will pursue nuclear disarmament. Instead, this new U.S. policy conveys a clear message to the 182 non-nuclear weapon states that the United States is moving strongly away from disarmament, and is in fact prepared to use nuclear weapons against non-nuclear adversaries. etc etc""""" _________________________________ As alluded in my blog above this one, I have extrapolated that, although it's not overt US policy to point nukes at non-nukes countries, in practice this has been the case for years. To ratify this status as an official government policy is only the surface of an iceberg of deceit and secret plans that have been formulated for yonks. We know that in a case of conflicts all options — from napalm to unranium deplete bullets, and the nuke option — are part of the six-shot revolver pack....
by John Richardson on Fri, 2005-10-28 09:56

‘Exxon Mobil Corp. had a quarter for the record books. The world's largest publicly traded oil company said Thursday high oil and natural-gas prices helped its third-quarter profit surge almost 75 percent to $9.92 billion, the largest quarterly profit for a US company ever, and it was the first to ring up more than $100 billion in quarterly sales.  

 

Net income ballooned to $9.92 billion, or $1.58 per share, from $5.68 billion, or 88 cents per share, a year ago. 

 

Exxon Mobil Posts New Record for Profit

by T.G.Kerr on Thu, 2005-10-27 14:55

Boffins against the bomb: US nuke policy rethink prompts physicist protest
Almost 500 physicists in the US have signed a petition protesting a proposed change in government policy that would allow the US to use nuclear weapons against non-nuclear countries. The proposed change in policy was reported in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. [...]

[extract from the petition]
This dangerous policy change ignores the fact that nuclear weapons are on a completely different scale than other WMD's and conventional weapons. Using a nuclear weapon pre-emptively and against a non-nuclear adversary crosses a line, blurring the sharp distinction that exists between nuclear and non-nuclear weapons, and heightens the probability of future use of nuclear weapons by others. The underlying principle of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is that in exchange for other countries forgoing the development of nuclear weapons, the nuclear weapon states will pursue nuclear disarmament. Instead, this new U.S. policy conveys a clear message to the 182 non-nuclear weapon states that the United States is moving strongly away from disarmament, and is in fact prepared to use nuclear weapons against non-nuclear adversaries. It provides a strong incentive for countries to abandon the NPT and pursue nuclear weapons themselves and dramatically increases the risk of nuclear proliferation, and ultimately the risk that regional conflicts will explode into all-out nuclear war, with the potential to destroy our civilization.

 

by Gus Leonisky on Thu, 2005-10-27 11:45
"Europe violates its own freedoms to fight against terrorism" is the headline in one of Europe most respected paper. Yes ... I am afraid to accept that it's not just our Johnnee-daddy who's gone wild bananas about "terrorising laws". It's a western world full-blown thingy. I have this deep heart-felt suspicion that western countries have made a secret pact (via emails and diplomatic bag missives) to all implement very similar — too similar — tough laws to stem was is, at least in the mind of our wetting their pants leaders, possibly from the deep dungeons of "intelligence" gathering, an upcoming massive tide of terror. These laws bluntly flaunt all the Human Rights ideals that we oh so strongly have defended for ourselves and purported to implement diligently in other countries. While the Unite Nations Human Rights Commission is slowly "studying" these new proposed laws, the trail-blazing speed at which they are pushed forward everywhere suggest that these laws — that are shooting down the fundamentals of Human Rights like ding-along ducks at a fun fair — indicate a general brown-pants panic. Amnesty International is basically our last bastion of organised sanity before we, individually, are left to fight these ludicrous laws. But Amnesty is overtly infiltrated by fast peddlers of these new laws. Our Attorney general, Phillip Ruddock, for example is a member of that organisation. How have we come so far on along this insane road? What has the West done wrong? What has the Muslim world done wrong? Any chance of improvements? The answers are complex and yet simple. Although there was some terrorism before, the irrefutable catalyst to this greater mess was the war in Iraq under the guise of a greater stupid declaration of a "war on terror"... . Most sane European countries knew it was going to be dicey at best and a disaster at worst. Presently it's something bad in between. Iraqi people awaiting less and less patiently the departure of US troops that are going to stay there for another 12 years minimum according to latest admission by Ducky Rumsfeld. The plan is for 25 years. Easy roll over of Saddam's armies... Easy fooling of most people with WMD porkies... But the slog is getting more and more demanding. In short, that war was the biggest deliberate cock-up since Hitler's invasion of Russia. Sure, these invasions have different dynamics and power-play but the psychological result on the people is that of vengeance, organised and disorganised insurgency, religious fanaticism, deviousness of attack through our wide field defences since our military front-lines are blurred with our populace. Unless "we keep the front way over there" we will find it extremely difficult to manage but it's very late for that... Even impossible apart from reducing the terror impact by a notch. We've been infiltrated. Europe — I would propose most of the western world — is awash with at least fifteen percent of Arabic Muslims. Nothing wrong with that. But this sheer number of law-abiding Muslim citizens (moderate or not) can produce what we've seen in the London Bombing: a small number of home grown bed of terror. And we keep shooting our selves in the foot at every corner of our panic on that subject. The strange mix of many factors — including the need for cheap labour and of "Christian" guilt from stuffing up others lives as we were plundering their resources for not much in return to them — led to absorb refugees (very commendable) has led to creating this time bomb. And we do not know where it's ticking. We have given mixed signals, contradictory signals... We have played super-tough with many refugees but also let enclaves being built within our mist — Sharing of a bit of space rather than sharing our spirits... All this mostly because of our laziness lacking the trying to make proper human contact with other people (including making sure the understanding of our acceptance of refugees is also subjective to their acceptance of us as we are — this is not so obviously made as it appears). The resentment, envy and hatred from years of colonial exploitation by our direct support of tyrants and "accidental" maintenance of poverty — including the increase of poverty as we modified the traditional food supplies, modified the survival rates without understanding of management of population explosions — all these have contributed to the web of revolt... In short we've fiddled big time. What is amazing is that we've copped so little. With the war in Iraq, we've hit a sleepy hornet' nest with a stick... And we know what can happen in this situation.... This is why our leaders, including Johnnee-cool, want laws that will absolve police from any cock ups should innocent people be shot like de Menezes in London. They want the power to crack down, on everything that moves with a whiff of dissent. These tight-arse policies won't work, except to reinforce our fears and destroy our own castles... We are going to be poorer for it. Solutions? There are many opportunities to defuse the problem even if there can be an unfortunate lag time of terror acts still performed while we actually do nothing more to attract attention, than go under ground with our "intelligence" gathering. We need to put the war on terror where it belongs: Back in the secret battles which have been the privilege of counter-terrorism organisations for centuries. We also need to remove the inflammatory words from our spruikings — words which can incite more people to join the ranks of terrorists. We need rhetorical restraint. We need less bumbling idiots as leaders. Most people, 99.9999 per cent want peace... Why did we elect bumbling idiots who chose war?... Unfortunately, our anti-terror laws will beef-up our war intentions....
by T.G.Kerr on Thu, 2005-10-27 11:38
From Iran's President Says Israel Must Be 'Wiped Off the Map'

[...] "I think it reconfirms what we have been saying about the regime in Iran," the White House press secretary, Scott McClellan, told reporters in Washington. according to The A.P. "It underscores the concerns we have about Iran's nuclear intentions." [...]

Reason enough to jump to Red Alert.

Mr McClelland was speaking in his native Klingonese. He is also fluent in Persian, so readers of NYT don't require the inconvenience of their own private interpretation of Mr Ahmadinejad's words.

In fact, in keeping with all pronouncements from the Burning Bush of truth and knowledge, it wasn't necessary to hear any words, at all. Lip syncing is enough.
by John Richardson on Thu, 2005-10-27 11:07

‘The US Congress should reject a Senate bill if it includes a White House-proposed amendment that would allow the CIA to abuse prisoners during interrogations, a human rights group said. 

 

Human Rights Watch said that under President George W. Bush, the United States has become "the only government in the world to claim a legal justification for mistreating prisoners during interrogation." 

 

"The administration is setting a dangerous example for the world when it claims that spy agencies are above the law," said Tom Malinowski, Washington director of Human Rights Watch.’ 

 

Only US Seeks to Justify Abuse

by John Richardson on Thu, 2005-10-27 11:03

‘For someone who aspires to the highest functions of the state, he does not seem to us to measure the impact of his words. He is in such turmoil to make it known that he is busy on every front, that he acts, that he doesn't seem to understand the thrust or the reach of his words.  

 

He's not speaking from the register of the fight against terrorism, but from the register of the puerile desire to exist.  

 

He wants to seem to be the one who knows everything, and that's called populism.’ 

 

"Gesticulation and Sleight of Hand"

by T.G.Kerr on Thu, 2005-10-27 10:53
From What does FEMA have against voting?
[...] Bowing to pressure from a united Democratic front, a small group of members of his own party, the religious community, and the labor movement, President Bush announced today he would reverse the decision he made in September to remove wage protections for construction workers in the areas affected by Hurricane Katrina. [...]
[...] Yep. Keep your eye on them at all times. [...]


Ted Rall on Journalism.
by T.G.Kerr on Thu, 2005-10-27 09:57

Look, folks, I'm with the Dark Prince.  There's been plenty of time for full and frank discussion about the new, and necessary, laws, since Mr Stanhope so helpfully posted them on his website for all to see. Bring it on, Cup Day or not.

If there happen to be, and I cannot see any problems at all,  a few quibbles over grammar and semantics, then we will be able to get a swift ruling from the appropriate higher authority. Who better to ask about matters of life and death, than a hang-em-high Texan, and his nominee for the US Supreme Court, Harriet Miers?

by John Richardson on Thu, 2005-10-27 07:29

‘ConocoPhillips, the No. 3 U.S. oil company, said third-quarter profit jumped 89 percent to a record $3.8 billion as supply disruptions and rising demand lifted prices to unprecedented highs.  

 

Net income rose to $2.68 a share from $2.01 billion, or $1.43 a share, a year earlier, the Houston-based company said today in a statement. Per-share profit was 11 cents higher than the average estimate from 19 analysts surveyed by Thomson Financial. Revenue increased 43 percent to $49.7 billion.  

 

Oil, natural-gas and gasoline prices, already near record levels because of rising demand in Asia and the Americas, set new highs after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita disrupted supplies from Gulf of Mexico wells and U.S. Gulf Coast refineries. Oil futures in New York averaged $63.31 a barrel during the third quarter, up 44 percent from a year earlier.  

 

“The economics of oil are great right now,'' said Phil McPherson, director of research at investment bank C.K. Cooper & Co. in Irvine, California. “When oil prices go up, it's supposed to stop demand, but that hasn't happened.''  

 

ConocoPhillips is the first of the major U.S. oil companies to report third-quarter earnings. Irving, Texas-based Exxon Mobil Corp., the world's largest publicly traded oil company, is scheduled to release its results tomorrow. Chevron Corp., the No. 2 U.S. oil producer, plans to report earnings on Oct. 28.’  

 

Supply & Demand