Saturday 20th of April 2019

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by Gus Leonisky on Sun, 2019-04-14 08:41

Congressional discussions over climate change have reached such a low point that during this week’s House hearing on the national security risks of climate change, former Secretary of State John Kerry, who was testifying, broke down and just asked his Republican questioner, “Are you serious?”

Kerry's incredulous question was in response to Republican Rep. Thomas Massie, the GOP star of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform hearing, which also featured testimony from former Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel. Kerry's and Hagel's testimonies were followed by several hours of, at times, excrutiating questioning from committee members.

Republicans made a big show of the fact that Massie has an engineering degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The conflict with Kerry arose when Massie tried to undermine Kerry's testimony on climate change because he has a political science degree from Yale.

Massie said, “I think it’s somewhat appropriate that somebody with a pseudoscience degree is here pushing pseudoscience in front of our committee today.”

If science degrees are important to Massie, he must have somehow missed the thousands of climate scientists around the world who have studiedpublishedtweetedmarched, and repeated that climate change is real, caused by humans, and having major impacts now.

During this hearing, Massie wasn’t alone in displaying bizarre logic to attack science and the reality of climate change. Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) apparently thought holding up a fossil disproved that humans are causing climate change.

Climate change has been changing all through the life of this planet. I’ve got a fossil right here from Western Wyoming — a desert — but that once was under an ocean,” he said.

Read more:

https://www.desmogblog.com/2019/04/10/john-kerry-republican-oversight-hearing-climate-national-security

 

On this site we are on top of the issue:

 

Please read again and again: http://www.yourdemocracy.net.au/drupal/node/33287

 

and: 

celebrating the madness of life...

 

dealing with the moronic one notion’s crew and the noah’s social club's chief, on a chemically lucky planet…

by Gus Leonisky on Sun, 2019-04-14 07:43

Australia’s top Great Barrier Reef officials warn the natural wonder will virtually collapse if the planet becomes 1.5 degrees hotter – a threshold that scientists say requires shutting down coal within three decades.

This federal election campaign is a potential tipping point for Australia’s direction on climate action, as the major parties pledge distinctly different ambitions for cutting greenhouse gas emissions.

However neither party has rejected the proposed Adani mine outright or promised to phase out coal, an export on which Australia is heavily reliant.

Climate change has already wrought devastating effects on the World Heritage-listed Great Barrier Reef, including two consecutive years of mass coral bleaching in 2016 and 2017.

In response to the threat, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority – the federal government’s lead agency for managing the reef – has prepared a climate change position statement.

The document, obtained by the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age under freedom of information laws, has not been released to the general public despite being in development for the past 15 months.

It states that limiting the average global temperature increase to 1.5 degrees or below since industrial times began – the higher end of the Paris agreement target - “is critical to maintain the ecological function of the Great Barrier Reef”. The world has already warmed by 1 degree.

Ecological function refers to roles performed by the reef's plants, animals and habitats, including providing a tourist experience. The authority has said these processes are necessary for the reef to exist.

The document cites scientific evidence that the reef could experience temperature-induced bleaching events twice per decade by about 2020 and annually by 2050 under high-emissions scenarios.

 

Read more:

https://www.smh.com.au/federal-election-2019/radical-climate-action-critical-to-great-barrier-reef-s-survival-government-body-says-20190413-p51dul.html

 

 

See toon at top. Read from top.

 

GBR and adani

From: https://www.insidetasmania.com/p/cartoons_3.html

by Gus Leonisky on Sun, 2019-04-14 07:39

 

https://www.insidetasmania.com

 

Inside Tasmania opposes all forms of group psychopathy. That includes the current government who inherited the Tasmanian genocide and benefit from a colonial political system. Inside Tasmania is protected by international law covering free speech and freedom of expression.

by Gus Leonisky on Sun, 2019-04-14 07:23

Independent MP Kerryn Phelps says "dirty tricks" are behind the removal of hundreds of political posters promoting her campaign for the federal seat of Wentworth in Sydney's affluent eastern suburbs.

Key points:

  • Campaign posters were taken down at Rose Bay, Bondi and Elizabeth Bay, Dr Phelps has alleged
  • Liberal Party candidate Dave Sharma denied removing them, saying his have also been taken down
  • A similar claim was made during last year's by-election in Wentworth by Dr Phelps, Labor's Tim Murray and the Justice Party's Ben Forsythe

 

Dr Phelps is fighting to retain the seat she won after a resounding 20 per cent swing against candidate Dave Sharma in the October by-election.

But on Friday night her posters were taken down in several locations along New South Head Road at Rose Bay, at Bondi and in Elizabeth Bay, Dr Phelps said.

"Well I think it's pretty obvious that there are some dirty tactics afoot and obviously in a grass roots campaign we rely on donations, we rely on volunteers," she said.

"For our posters to go up and then to be taken down … this happened in the by-election [and] it's happened again, it's incredibly frustrating."

 

Read more:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-04-13/kerryn-phelps-claims-campaign-posters-taken-down/11000434

 

 

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by Gus Leonisky on Sun, 2019-04-14 02:34

museum

This large mural in Newtown, Sydney, Australia, of the The Natural History Museum in London, has since disappeared, replaced by a building of offices, shops and apartments. This mural, painted with spray cans, was a massive undertaking for an artist, knowing that the work would eventually be destroyed...

In front of it was a realistic concrete sculpture of a 1980/90s computer and full cathode-ray tube. Amazing obsolescence.

 

Below, Gus called this: "Staircase to Nowhere" in a new building in New York... introduced here as a counterpoint to the utilitarian staircase of the museum above...

 

modern staircase...

 


by Gus Leonisky on Sat, 2019-04-13 16:36

Two weeks after extending the freeze on arms sales to Saudi Arabia, Berlin has approved the delivery of components for military equipment destined for Riyadh. They will be delivered to Paris, which will then export them to Riyadh.


According to several German media outlets, including Deutsche Welle, the National Security Council of Germany - a body made up of Chancellor Angela Merkel and her key ministers - has decided to approve the delivery of German-made parts for equipment military service to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

 

 

https://francais.rt.com/international/60933-allemagne-va-vendre-armes-arabie-saoudite-emirats-arabes-unis

 

 

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by Gus Leonisky on Sat, 2019-04-13 14:04

With yesterdays arrest of Julian Assange, we thought it important to remember WHY he was in the Empire’s crosshairs. The video Collateral Murder (below) is WikiLeaks’ most famous, most shocking release. Footage of US military personnel murdering civilians and journalists and laughing about it.

This is the shortened version, the full unedited footage can be found here, with notes transcripts and accompanying memos and press-releases available here.

 

See more:

https://off-guardian.org/2019/04/13/watch-collateral-murder/

 

Read from top.

 

 

Meanwhile:

After the International Criminal Court (ICC) declined to investigate claims of US atrocities in Afghanistan, US President Donald Trump cheered the decision but said the ICC was “illegitimate” and US and allies beyond its reach.

“This is a major international victory, not only for these patriots, but for the rule of law,” the White House said in a statement, referring to the ICC decision to reject the request to investigate the actions of US military and intelligence officials in Afghanistan.

The US “holds American citizens to the highest legal and ethical standards,” and has consistently refused to join the ICC because of its “broad, unaccountable prosecutorial powers,” threats to US sovereignty, and “and other deficiencies that render it illegitimate,” Trump said in a statement.

 

Read more:

https://www.rt.com/news/456363-victory-trump-icc-atrocities/

by Gus Leonisky on Sat, 2019-04-13 13:47
Advertising has polluted culture beyond recognition, but it serves a purpose in pushing the aggressive conquest of the world as a counterpoint to ugly politics by the USA, down our throat, like the sugar coating of a bitter pill. Music is used in advertising to a powerful effect and one can become slave of the tunes. Who can forget Charlie, the jingle writer of Two and a Half Men, working on the crassest of tune to end up with an ever crasser one… 





 

As Trump — and I mean Trump, not America — wages a trade war against China, the kind of “you buy my burgeredcocacolamcdonald’s culture or we slap a tariff on importing chopsticks”, we cannot forget that American “culture” — if we can call this often lowest denominator crappy artistic adventurism, a culture — has been a pollutant around the world, like the plastics of the Koch brothers in the Pacific Vortex. It’s enticing though and satisfyingly practical for those need of speed-food (fast-food is old hat), like throwaway drinking straws and foam cups. On the popular front of "belching" (singing is old hat), new artists and variation of shouting-in-a-mike performances, always come on the scene like soldiers of rabble, exposing their rotten lives in the women mags, to maintain popularity. It’s as annoying as reflux. It’s conquest by relentless waves of quantity of gooey fudge...



There was a bit of cross-culture though, such as Down and Out in Beverly Hills, the 1986 American comedy film based on the French play Boudu sauvé des eaux. The 1932 film directed by Jean Renoir, was based on a play by René Fauchois. it has been called, "not only a lovely fable about a bourgeois attempt to reform an early hippy (in 1932!)... but a … record of an earlier France.” I feel that the long lost purpose of the French revolution had gone soft and its belly has filled with errant residue.

Directed by Paul Mazursky, and starring Nick Nolte, Bette Midler and Richard Dreyfuss, the film is about a rich dysfunctional couple who save the life of a suicidal homeless man. Little Richard makes an appearance, with the song "Great Gosh a’Mighty” finishing off this now acquired exposé of American sweet decadence. The smart dog is the star of the show, of course. It was the first film released by Disney to receive an R-rating — I guess for showing barely covered G-strings butt-cracks on the females fallen into the swimming pool, though the morals left a lot to be desired as they say.



Another bit of cross-culture filum, lacking a bit from the original delivery, was the American remake of La Cage aux Follesa 1978 Franco-Italian comedy film, the first film adaptation of Jean Poiret's 1973 play La Cage aux Folles.
It was co-written and directed by Édouard Molinaro and stars Ugo Tognazzi and Michel Serrault (Poiret’s comic partner). The Birdcage (1996) was directed by Mike Nichols, written by Elaine May, and starring Robin Williams, Gene Hackman, Nathan Lane, and Dianne Wiest. 



But apart from these few exception, and the occasional French/German/Swedish/Danish Movie Festivals in Nouyorque, the Hollywoodian traffic has been one way especially on TV. As well, the American “pop” culture has jumped over its petri-dish, and has become a worldwide microbial bird flu. 


Here, in studying this disease, we should start with one of the best American crooner who, I have been told between two and a half empty glass of beer, was relegated to the back of the pack by “the Mafia” that openly supported Frank Sinatra insteadJohn Gary (John Gary Strader; November 29, 1932 – January 4, 1998) was considered by many to be much better than old Frankie, due to his extraordinary breath control and tonal quality of voice. Gary had an "exceptionally" wide range of three and 1/2 octaves, from robust baritone to a high sweet tenor often in the same song, in an intimate style.



Talking of exception, a short-lived invader of the American Kultur was Ivan Rebroff (31 July 1931 – 27 February 2008) — a singer who became sort of famous in Yankeeland. Born in Berlin as Hans-Rolf Rippert to German parents, he claimed mixed Russian-Jewish descent. He rose to prominence for his extensive vocal range of four and a half octaves (exceptional!), from the soprano to bass registers. Four days after his death, his elder brother Horst Rippert, who by his own unsubstantiated account had, during WW2, shot down Antoine de Saint Exupéryclaimed a big chunk of Rebroff's vast fortune. I will remind you that Saint-Ex is famous for The Little Prince where the narrator begins with a discussion on the nature of grown-ups and their inability to perceive important things. As a test to determine if a grown-up is as enlightened as a child, he shows them a picture he drew at age 6 of a snake which has eaten an elephant. The grown-ups always replied that the picture is that of a hat, so he knows to talk only of "reasonable" rather than imaginative things to them. 


Then came Demis Roussos as the caped cleanser.



Meanwhile, Francis Albert Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was one of the best-selling music artists of all time, with more than 150 million records worldwide. Born to Italian immigrants in Hoboken, New Jersey, Sinatra began his musical career in the swing era with bandleaders Harry James and Tommy Dorsey. Sinatra found success as a solo artist after he signed with Columbia Records in 1943, becoming the idol of the "bobby soxers". His professional career stalled by the early 1950s, so he turned to Las Vegas, where he became one of its best known residency performers as part of The Rat Pack. In 1953, in From Here to Eternity, his performance won an Academy Award and a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor. 


A counterpoint to this world invading crooning rat pack poison, was Jacques Romain Georges Brel (born 8 April 1929) who died too soon in 1978.  He was a Belgian singer, songwriter, actor and director who composed and performed literate (rare feat in this day and age of pop music), thoughtful, and theatrical songs that generated a large, devoted following—initially in Belgium and France, later throughout the world. He is considered a master of the modern chanson. Although most of his songs were in French and occasionally in Dutch, he became an influence on English-speaking songwriters and performers, such as Scott Walker, David Bowie, Alex Harvey, Marc Almond and Rod McKuen. English translations of his songs were recorded by many performers, including: Bowie; Walker, Ray Charles; Judy Collins; John Denver; The Kingston Trio; Nina Simone; Frank Sinatra and Andy Williams.


Who can forget “If You go Away” (Ne Me Quitte Pas) ....







Another invasion of real European popular culture into the US psyche was "Autumn Leaves" — a popular song and jazz standard composed by Joseph Kosma with original lyrics by poet Jacques Prévert in French, and later by Johnny Mercer in English. Kosma was a Hungarian who was introduced to Prévert in Paris. They collaborated on the song ''Les Feuilles Mortes'' (The Dead Leaves) for the 1946 film Les portes de la nuit, where it was sung by Irène Joachim. Kosma was influenced by a piece of ballet music, "Rendez-vous" written for Roland Petit, which was itself borrowed partially from "Poème d'Octobre" by Jules Massenet. Johnny Mercer wrote English lyrics and gave it the title "Autumn Leaves".



But the American film music was also invaded by Europeans such as Erich Wolfgang Korngold (May 29, 1897 – November 29, 1957) — an Austrian-born composer and conductor. A child prodigy, he became one of the most important and influential composers in the history of Hollywood. He was a noted pianist and composer of classical music, and the first composer of international stature to write many Hollywood scores.



From England came John Barry Prendergast, OBE (3 November 1933 – 30 January 2011) who composed the scores for 11 of the James Bond films between 1963 and 1987, and also arranged and performed the "James Bond Theme" to the first film in the series, 1962's Dr. No. He wrote the Grammy- and Academy Award-winning scores to the films Dances with Wolves and Out of Africa, as well as the theme for the British television cult series The Persuaders!, In 1999, he was appointed OBE for services to music.

---------------------------


In many American ersatzTV series and B-grade movies, the music is often use as a set-the-emotion continuum to hide the blandness of the inane dialogues that follow a script predictably stacked like a McDonald hamburger that would not sustain any intellectual value but satisfy fat brain cells with cholesterolic stodge.


This cesspooled US culture is invading your brain like cancer… Some of it you can laugh about, some of it, you should make every effort to prevent it passing the front door. Especially the culture of war... and did I mention advertising — the cultural toilet. Our Scummo was a try-hard expert at that, but he failed and will fail hopefully.



Gus Leonisky

Former local advertising guru and bricklayer...
by Gus Leonisky on Fri, 2019-04-12 15:03

'So called' settled climate science isn't settled, says Tony Abbott

by Gus Leonisky on Fri, 2019-04-12 14:55


Steve Bannon Declares War on China

 


His provocative new think tank flays the Communist nation, an issue that divides foreign policy realists today.


 

Despite its dispiritingly anti-intellectual president, the Trump era has paradoxically been the Age of the Think Tank.

It’s no secret that the president often lacks in ideological consistency. Some would say that contributed to his success in the 2016 general election. So for those not too proud to play the game, it’s a wide-open field for trying to steer the administration’s prerogatives in one ideological direction or the other. 

That’s not necessarily a bad thing, depending on who you ask. But it does make every day  in the little-understood, bureaucratic underworld of policy shop shenanigans a veritable knife fight.

The latest entrant is the Committee on the Present Danger. Represented by former White House strategist Steve Bannon and Frank Gaffney, head of the Center for Security Policy, this is third resuscitation of a foreign policy interest group that has existed in manifold forms since the advent of the Cold War.

Bannon and Gaffney say the world has changed: far from paling in comparison to the Soviet challenge, Xi Jinping’s China is a something Marxist Eurasia never was: an economic peer—even a successor state. Additionally, they argue, Xi and his team in Beijing are authoritarians with Alexandrian ambition, a marked departure from the Chinese technocrats who have reigned since leader Deng Xiaoping retired in 1989. 

“A radical cadre led by President Xi and Wang Quisan have consolidated power within the CCP,” Bannon told me. “This cadre has enslaved the Chinese people.”

Red Scares dominated the States sixty years ago; but following the butchery of Josef Stalin, short of a brief, soul-searching moment when Sputnik darted the heavens, it never appeared to most reasonably thinking people that Leninism was ever preferable to what we had here in the United States. As the peerless historian Stephen Kotkin precisely notes: “What’s the difference between communism and fascism? Communism is over.”

Critics pooh-pooh the China challenge, saying the build-up of Western tension with the Communist nation today is but a shadow of the grand, murderous philosophical competition that dominated the last century. They’re wrong. As Bannon and Gaffney suggest, the encore of efficient authoritarianism is the story of our time, an existential challenge for the West’s way of doing business not seen since the 1930’s.

 

Read more:

https://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/steve-bannon-declares-war-on-china/

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When Bannon departed the Trump Admin, I though "ehllo helloe hullow". I guessed what this meant. After having managed to bring Trump to the White House, Bannon's job had been done. He was not going to gather mould in the now "official" environment. He had to go, whether in (fake) disgrace or under a cloud, in order to distance himself from the Trump machine. His next job, once removed from the constraints of the officialdom at the white house, has been to do "Trump's work below the waterline...". Basically this is doing the hidden dirty work of manipulating ideas to push the game plan... without being seen. Unattached, he can stir the world with concepts, some hidden threats and rightwing views, upset the apple cart, things that slowly become the throughline of the administration — as the road is "cleared". Bannon is like a commando acting outside the demands and the paperwork of the army. He report to no-one, but he knows the drill. He sabotages other country ideals that would be contrary to the long haul on the road of US "efficient authoritarianism" (a form of soft/hypocritical fascism) in their conquest of the planet. This is like bombing the roadsides of diplomatic channels, without the White House doing it. Bannon is a submarine that sends psychological torpedoes into the minds of pompous politicians who believe in their self-importance rather than understand the full game being played. At this level, the Europeans are vulnerable because they are "traditionalists" and believe that the shit in front of them is icecream... The eastern states of Europe are more astute, but they are embroiled in the web of European "unity". Turkey is annoying the USA but the USA are patient... They push, shove and cajole at the same time. The size of the carrots in front of  the donkey increases while the Russians are pulling the tail back. Bannon might provide a small trigger for a switch... Often, that's all that is needed for a 180 degrees turnaround.

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