Thursday 23rd of September 2021

of journalism...

journalism

Judge Vanessa Baraitser seems to have no idea about “investigative” journalism. In the case of Julian Assange, no-one would believe him if he wrote an opinion piece about the documents and videos in his possession. Releasing the documents themselves was the only thing to do, in order to do JUSTICE TO THE TRUTH. 



In his wisdom, many documents were redacted to prevent exposing people to danger. BUT the Guardian and other publications to whom these documents had been entrusted, revealed the access keys to find the names and if I remember well, they published some unredacted documents. Assange was not happy. He got the blame. This is why The Guardian employed some grubby “journalists”, such as Luke Harding, to dirty Julian Assange as much as possible.

As well, in order to muck up the game, some of the “liberal” journalists, unhappy about the dump of Hillary’s emails from Wikileaks, tied Julian Assange to Putin — which was a damn lie, but this made these morons feel justified about dumping upon Assange.

Meanwhile the conditions of solitary imprisonment imposed by Vanessa Baraitser were disgusting and could be describe as worse than Hannibal Lecter's. 

The truth will eventually prevail, hopefully…

Assange will have to watch his back. Luckily he might have a group of people ready to take a bullet for him, but beware of traitors nonetheless. Stung one, twice shy.

justice...

The Sputnik cameraman by end of transmission, and possibly not seen on these two (shared?) stream of RT and Sputnik had the great sense of focusing on the statue of JUSTICE, at the top of the building. 

 

justice...

 

This is a cropped view of the image...

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zU26JEGs76Q&ab_channel=RT


Live from outside court in London as judge rules Assange cannot be extradited to US40,574 views•Streamed live 15 hours ago

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5OTolOTPRw

 

Sputnik is live outside #London's Central Criminal Court as UK District Judge Vanessa Baraitser is expected to deliver her verdict on whether WikiLeaks founder #JulianAssange can be extradited to the United States. Assange's #extradition trial ended at London's Old Bailey court on 1 October after his defence team spent four weeks trying to prove that the whistleblower was being indicted for political reasons.

 

Note: Sputnik and RT are in part or in whole funded by the Russian government. Without them we would not have seen Assange being taken away from the Ecuadorian embassy by the English police...

how cozy are you with your lawyer and your judge?...

Privilege and Punishment: How Race and Class Matter in Criminal Court

 

How the attorney-client relationship favors the privileged in criminal court—and denies justice to the poor and to working-class people of color

 

The number of Americans arrested, brought to court, and incarcerated has skyrocketed in recent decades. Criminal defendants come from all races and economic walks of life, but they experience punishment in vastly different ways. Privilege and Punishment examines how racial and class inequalities are embedded in the attorney-client relationship, providing a devastating portrait of inequality and injustice within and beyond the criminal courts.

Matthew Clair conducted extensive fieldwork in the Boston court system, attending criminal hearings and interviewing defendants, lawyers, judges, police officers, and probation officers. In this eye-opening book, he uncovers how privilege and inequality play out in criminal court interactions. When disadvantaged defendants try to learn their legal rights and advocate for themselves, lawyers and judges often silence, coerce, and punish them. Privileged defendants, who are more likely to trust their defense attorneys, delegate authority to their lawyers, defer to judges, and are rewarded for their compliance. Clair shows how attempts to exercise legal rights often backfire on the poor and on working-class people of color, and how effective legal representation alone is no guarantee of justice.

Superbly written and powerfully argued, Privilege and Punishment draws needed attention to the injustices that are perpetuated by the attorney-client relationship in today’s criminal courts, and describes the reforms needed to correct them.

 

Read more:

https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691194332/privilege-and-punishment

 

 

     

     

    Julian Assange would have been erased by such a "justice" system...

     

     

    let him free...
    former robocop now in charge of robolaws to decide your freedom to know nothing ...
    assange in prison...
    the agent of truth is disliked by the agents of lies...
    potato man tells you that the australian federal police is "doing its successful job" to protect you from knowing something...
    war & peace & lies & truth & the need for whistleblowers...(note: the painting on the wall has disappeared, replaced by a window…)
    treated like common criminals for telling the truth...
    bugging of the government offices of Timor Leste in 2004: howard and downer should be in prison...
    when elected criminals use the law to run the government...
    the FBI investigate epstein suicide...
    creepy freedom of choosing newspeak propaganda to obey big brother...

    shooting the marathon man..
    the truth is that our masters don't want us to know the truth...
    killing democracy...
    imprisoning einstein for telling the truth...
    not a convict past...
    apparently their errand friends killed jesus 2000 years ago for the same reasons...
    an illegal operation by the ecuadorian government, by the USA and by the UK — and by Australia...

    opinion polls, slanted editorials and fake independence of the media...
    tony kevin: US going after assange through chelsea...
    a kiss is just a kiss...
    American Exceptionalism ...
    emails that shot hillary in the foot...
    TIME TO LET HIM FREE...
    as if...
    it smells a bit like totalitarianism... and it is surveillance capitalism without borders...
    a troubling foundation...
    the empire's liberal-progressives-neocons want war as they fear the truth more than bombs...
    we need him more than ever...
    FREE ASSANGE...

    in a cheeky swimsuit...

    "Paige VanZant kicks off the new year in a cheeky swimsuit". This is the extend of the new news on the NYP...
    The New York Post has totally ignored the court case of the century… On the 5th of January 2021, not a single mention of Julian Assange as far as I can see… We know that Mr Murdoch and most of his minions hate Julian Assange, except for maybe Miranda Devine who told us recently (September 6, 2020) https://nypost.com/2020/09/06/antifa-riots-could-be-part-of-democrat-power-grab-devine/:


    Snowden was an intelligence contractor who leaked information showing the National Security Agency was spying on US citizens during the Bush and Obama administrations.

    The leak was in the public interest, but Snowden betrayed his employer.

    Assange, on the other hand, merely published the information he received from jailed former US Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning.

    It was the same when WikiLeaks published the DNC ­emails that caused such a stir in the 2016 campaign. Dems insisted the Russians hacked the emails, while others suggested it was an inside leak.

    “Julian has always maintained that the source of the DNC emails was not a state actor,” Assange’s mother, Christine, told me Saturday.

    Given what we have learned during Russiagate about the compromised state of our intelligence agencies, Assange deserves a medal rather than jail.



    ————————

    Wow!


    In 2010, Miranda had already a soft spot for Julian, the “rapist”… She told us :



    NO one believes Julian Assange is now sitting in a British jail cell because he is a rapist. The Swedish charges have been a convenient way to shut up the Australian-born founder of WikiLeaks, who keeps embarrassing the powerful by publishing details of 250,000 secret US documents on the internet.


    Miranda Devine (https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/blogs/miranda-devine/we-all-know-why-julian-assange-is-in-jail/news-story/)

    December 8, 2010 - 7:16PM

    The Daily Telegraph   0 comments


    In fact, the allegations against Assange, 39, which were the basis of an international warrant for his arrest, make a mockery of rape. How long did it take to arrest the men who raped and murdered thousands of Bosnians in the Srebrenica genocide of 1995? Yet Assange has been locked up for what the UK Daily Mail describes as two one-night stands in August and “allegations [that] simply don’t ring true.” The two alleged victims have been all over Twitter and the media giving a version of their encounters with Assange which appear to be more about women scorned than women victimised. The most comprehensive story detailing the allegations appeared in the Daily Mail on Tuesday, claiming Assange slept with a feminist activist who had lent him her apartment when he was in Stockholm in August to speak at a seminar. They reportedly went out for dinner and then home to her flat and had sex, during which a condom broke. They remained on friendly terms, with the woman throwing him a party the next night. By the following day, however, he had already met another female fan, in the seminar audience, with whom he was "intimate" after lunch. A couple of days later Assange and his new admirer slept together at her house using a condom. The next morning they had sex again, without a condom. She later complained that she was upset about his refusal to wear a condom. Nevertheless they went out for breakfast together and he promised to stay in touch. Then she phoned the woman in whose apartment Assange was staying and learned that he had been sleeping with both of them. "The sex had been consensual from the start but had eventually turned into abuse," they later told a reporter. The women went to the police and the media and hired a "gender lawyer" to go after Assange using Sweden's complex sex laws. Soon enough, Assange was on Interpol's most-wanted list for sex crimes, despite the fact, as the Mail writes, “there is scant evidence — in the public domain at least — of rape, sexual molestation or unlawful coercion.” We now have American politicians calling for Assange to be executed, Canadians saying he should be assassinated, Sarah Palin saying he should be hunted down “like Osama bin Laden”, and bloggers calling for his Australian son, 20-year-old Daniel Assange, to be kidnapped. And the Australian Prime Minister's response has been to call him a criminal and threaten to cancel his passport. David Hicks got better treatment and he was bearing arms in Afghanistan for the enemy. Where's Dick Smith now? The fact is that if American security is so weak and incompetent that a lovelorn soldier lip-syncing to Lady GaGa can steal secret information and wreak supposed havoc, then Assange should be thanked for bringing the vulnerability to our attention. If the information WikiLeaks is releasing is so threatening to international security, why wasn't it better protected? And if the top secret, sensitive information is actually locked up so tightly that WikiLeaks can't get hold of it, then all Assange has done wrong is to embarrass people in high places. We didn't need WikiLeaks to tell us that Kevin Rudd is a pompous ass. But the revelations that US diplomats regarded him as an "abrasive impulsive control freak" who blundered about the world making "snap announcements without consulting other countries or within the Australian government" is useful. WikiLeaks has shown what a liability Rudd's ego has been to Australia's image abroad, and if he has any shame, the revelations ought to take some of the newfound spring out of his step. The official fury unleashed against Assange is largely about the embarrassment WikiLeaks has created for diplomats. But the US is lucky it is Assange controlling the information because he does abide by some sort of moral code. Writing in The Australian newspaper yesterday he said his "core values" were forged in the small Queensland town where he grew up - "where people spoke their minds bluntly. They distrusted big government as something that could be corrupted if not watched carefully… WikiLeaks was created around these core values. The idea, conceived in Australia, was to use internet technologies in new ways to report the truth.” Assange represents a peculiarly Generation X breed of egocentric moral anarchist - simultaneously altruistic, idealistic and cynical. His mother Christine, who runs a puppet theatre in Queensland, has denied to The Sunshine Coast Daily that she was ever a hippie. But she brought up her son with a distrust of authority, common to fatherless boys. According to The New Yorker, he had moved 37 times by the time he was 14. He was a clever boy who was home-schooled, read voraciously, and became a computer hacker early on. From 11 to 16 he lived "on the run" with his mother and half-brother, hiding from a stepfather. Today he is a citizen of the world, described by his lawyers as "homeless" and living in airports and the homes of friends. It is an unorthodox, almost stoical life, and some of his expressed political views are pure left-wing anti-globalisation conspiracy. But he is on the side of truth, which has no ideological bent; WikiLeaks has caused equal opportunity squirming from both right and left. On climate change for instance, WikiLeaks was only tangentially involved with the climategate emails, which threw so much light on the dishonesty of the global warming industry. But it has more recently released US diplomatic cables which reveal some of the secret arm-twisting, bribery, coercion and plain greed behind the post-Copenhagen climate accord. It also reveals the existence of a shadowy global climate organisation of legislators that sounds like something out of an Alex Rider novel: GLOBE International, "Global Legislators Organisation for a Balanced Environment." WikiLeaks has also revealed that, far from being too hawkish on the threat of Iran's nuclear program, the US and Israel are in reality remarkably restrained compared to Iran's Arab neighbours, who have been urging the US to "cut off the head of the snake". As Assange says, no evidence has been produced by his critics that anyone has been harmed as a result of WikiLeaks revelations, or that intelligence sources were compromised by the release of Afghan war logs. 


    Perhaps his worst crime is that he has hired the insufferable Australian grandstander Geoffrey Robertson as his lawyer and counts among his most ardent supporters Noam Chomsky, John Pilger and Jemima Khan.



    Forward and back to 2016, Miranda flawed idol, Donald Trump, may not have been elected, but for Julian Assange… Everyone knows this. 


    Most other "liberal" Main Stream Media have the trial of the century on page 145 (or nowhere to be seen) — way after the news that an aged actress had been wrongly declared dead by her publicist, after a fall. We wish her a full recovery and get off the front page, please... So there.

    it makes absolutely no sense...

    It makes absolutely “no sense” to keep Julian Assange locked up any longer, WikiLeaks editor-in-chief Kristinn Hrafnsson said shortly after a judge in London rejected his latest bail request.

    Speaking to reporters outside the court building, Hrafnsson called District Judge Vanessa Baraitser’s ruling a “great disappointment.”

    It’s unjust, unfair, and illogical, when you consider her ruling two days ago about Julian’s health.

    On Monday, Baraitser refused to allow Assange’s extradition to the US, citing concerns that the American justice system cannot prevent his possible suicide behind bars. Yet on Wednesday, she refused to grant bail, saying there is a high risk of the defendant not showing up for the appeal proceedings.

    Baraitser previously denied Assange’s bail requests in September 2019 and March 2020 for the same reason.

    At the same time, the activist’s lawyer has argued that the judge’s recent decision to deny extradition “massively reduces” any motivation not to appear in court.

    Hrafnsson told reporters that Assange’s physical and mental health has significantly deteriorated in the high-security Belmarsh prison in London, where he has already served a 50-week sentence for skipping bail in 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden.

    “To send him back there doesn’t make any sense,” Hrafnsson said, adding that the ruling will likely be appealed in the nearest future. “The fight will continue. We want this to end, but we have confidence that justice will prevail.”

    Stella Morris, Assange’s partner and the mother of his two children, stressed that the activist should not have been locked up in Belmarsh in the first place. “I urge the [US] Department of Justice to drop the charges and the President of the United States to pardon Julian,” she said.

    In the US, Assange is accused of conspiracy to obtain and release top secret information pertaining to the conduct of American troops in Afghanistan and Iraq. He could face up to 175 years in prison if extradited and found guilty of all charges. 

     

    Read more:

    https://www.rt.com/news/511693-assange-bail-request-rejected-hrafnsson/

     

    Keeping assange in prison CONTRIBUTES TO THE DETERIORATION OF HIS MENTAL STATE. Is this Judge genuine about her verdict?

     

    FREE ASSANGE TODAY!

     

    Read from top. see also:

    publish and be damned...

    assange's detention must end – now....


    Western governments will have blood on their hands unless they stop persecuting Julian Assange

     


    By SPENCER ZIFCAK | On 18 January 2021

    The case of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange is complex, containing elements of law, freedom of speech and of the media, journalism, politics, international relations and health. In the recent hearing to determine whether Assange should be extradited to the US, health became the dominant discourse. He may die if several Western governments do not stop persecuting him. 

    Assange is seriously mentally ill. The magistrate in the extradition proceeding decided he could not be extradited to the US because if he were, it was highly likely he would die by suicide. Other aspects of the legal reasoning in that judgment were open to criticism, but this one wasn’t.

    Assange is a political prisoner, having been locked up for 10 years at the behest of the governments of the US, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Ecuador and, because of its neglect of his cause, Australia.

    Assange was the director of Wikileaks at the time it released a hoard of US government documents revealing details of American political and military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Some quarter of a million documents were involved. Extracts were published in association with the Guardian, the New York Times, Le Monde and El Pais. The US went after Assange, not the newspaper editors.

    Wikileaks was not in league with any nation that was America’s enemy. It sought to expose to the world the nefarious and sometimes deadly activity in which the US and, later, other governments had engaged. It acted like any journalist with a brief to investigate matters of national security might have done. It disclosed classified documents in the public interest so that news organisations could report on their content and the public could make evidence-based assessments as to the propriety of the actions that had been revealed.

    Nevertheless, the US government argued that the documents’ disclosure might have caused serious damage. The contention was that in releasing the trove of documents, Wikileaks had endangered the work and the lives of local people who had acted as informers on behalf of the US government and its allies.

    It has not been widely reported, however, that the US government commissioned an internal investigation to study the effect of the disclosures and to produce a list of people who might have been killed because of the revelations. After an exhaustive examination, the team of 120 counter-intelligence operatives, under the direction of Brigadier Robert Carr, determined that it had not been able to find a single person who had died as a result of the Wikileaks releases.

    Despite this finding, even as late as the recent UK extradition hearing, the US government has continued to assert that a number of of its military collaborators and citizen informers had been killed or injured as a result of Wikileaks’ disclosures.

    Assange had been working for some time in the UK. However, his freedom ended not long after the document dump in 2010. The cause was allegations of rape brought against him by prosecutors in Stockholm. The Swedish Government sought his extradition from the UK to answer questions in relation to alleged offences that had occurred during two separate episodes of sexual intercourse with women while in the Swedish capital.

    Apart from those involved no one knows exactly what happened on those two evenings. The stories of the participants are starkly opposed. Assange claimed his innocence from the outset. The two complainants’ accounts could not be dismissed. That said, Swedish prosecutors eventually discontinued all relevant criminal proceedings. Assange was neither tried nor convicted of rape or any other sexual misdemeanour.

    The significance of these events lies not in the facts about the sexual interactions, however, but in the extradition proceedings that emerged from them. As soon as the Swedish Government initiated extradition proceedings, the UK Government took Assange into detention. There followed an extraordinary series of events.

    Assange was desperately afraid that if he were extradited to face charges in Sweden, no matter what the outcome, the Swedish Government would send him on to the US to face prosecution in relation to Wikileaks’ activities in publishing classified information. The focus of US attention remained upon the Iraq/Afghanistan revelations. The US Government denied it intended to charge Assange but, drip by drip, news leaked out that a Grand Jury had been convened to determine what criminal charges he would face if returned to the custody of US authorities.

    To avoid extradition to the US, Assange skipped bail in the UK and took up asylum in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London. This foreshadowed a personal disaster. The UK Government established a permanent police presence outside the Embassy and made it clear Assange would be arrested as soon as he tried to leave it.

    Inside the Embassy, he had two rooms, one tiny living room and an equally tiny bathroom. His stay at the Embassy lasted seven years. He could not go outside. He was deprived of fresh air, sunlight, the ability to move and exercise freely and access to medical care. The UK Government refused to allow his transfer to a teaching hospital for medical treatment. Doctors were discouraged from visiting him at the Embassy. It was as if he were in solitary confinement.

    Foreign governments placed immense pressure on Ecuador to allow them to engage in surveillance. Assange was subject to constant watch. He was surveilled in private and with visitors, including family, friends, journalists, lawyers and doctors. His rights to privacy, freedom of speech, legal professional privilege and doctor-patient care were consistently violated. After some years of confinement, his health began to deteriorate.

    In 2015, the United Nations Committee on Arbitrary Detention determined that Assange’s confinement inside the Embassy constituted a grave breach of his right to be free from arbitrary detention. It observed that he had been denied the opportunity to defend himself against the Swedish allegations; the duration of his detention had been incompatible with the presumption of innocence; he had been denied the right to contest the necessity and proportionality of his arrest, and his detention for five years had put his health at serious risk.

    In a letter to The Lancet, 117 British doctors complained that Julian had been treated cruelly and suffered medical neglect. They said:

    “We condemn the torture of Assange. We condemn the denial of his fundamental right to appropriate health care. We condemn the climate of fear surrounding the provision of health care to him. We condemn the violations of his right to doctor-patient confidentiality. Politics cannot be allowed to interfere with the right to health and the practice of medicine.”

    Following a change of government in Ecuador in 2018, Assange was dragged by London police from the Ecuadorian Embassy and locked up in Britain’s notorious Belmarsh prison along with the nation’s most dangerous criminals. He had pleaded guilty to breaching bail and was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment.

    After he was detained by the UK, the US Government finally showed its hand. It charged him with 17 counts of violating the US Espionage Act. His ‘espionage’ consisted of releasing the original trove of Iraq/Afghan files. Among other things, these files disclosed alleged war crimes, the deaths of civilians at the hands of American troops, the infliction of torture, arbitrary detention and governmental corruption. Wikileaks had provided crucial information upon which news organisations and citizens around the world could discern the morass of the Middle-East war.

    The Espionage Act defines the unauthorised publication of national defence or classified information as a felony. Critically, it does not allow for a public interest defence. That means a jury is barred from taking into account the difference between a whistleblower exposing government crimes to the press, and a spy selling state secrets to a foreign government.

    The prosecution constitutes a grave threat to independent journalism. Every national security journalist who reports on US classified information now faces possible espionage charges. It paves the way for the US government to indict other international journalists and publishers. It normalises other countries’ prosecution of journalists as spies.

    A few weeks ago, a UK magistrate refused the US Government’s request that Assange be extradited for trial. She did so because of the risk he might suffer grave damage to his mental health. He was not granted bail, however, and remains in Belmarsh.

    Assange’s mental state is critically compromised. It was clear, for example, that he could not properly comprehend the nature and content of his extradition hearing late last year. Following a detailed examination of his situation in Belmarsh prison, the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture and Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment reported that the cumulative effect of his shocking treatment over a decade had constituted psychological torture. His conclusion was damning:

    “In 20 years of work with victims of war, violence and persecution, I have never seen a group of democratic States ganging up deliberately to isolate, demonise and abuse a single individual for such a long time and with so little regard for human dignity and the rule of law.” 

    His detention must end – now.

     

    Read more:

    https://johnmenadue.com/western-governments-will-have-blood-on-their-hands-unless-they-stop-persecuting-julian-assange/

     

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