Wednesday 1st of December 2021

scomo's pitt...

pittpitt

A key aim in the appointment is for the Nationals to have a senior minister who is across the detail of the climate policy to make sure the party secures the safeguards it is being promised to prevent climate measures hurting regional communities.

The Nationals are confident of gaining changes to the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation to ease what they see as “green tape” on farmers and miners, sparking a likely fight in Parliament over the scale of the changes when Labor and the Greens want stronger checks on new projects.

 

More infrastructure spending will also be part of the final package, including support for an extension of the inland rail project being built from Melbourne to Brisbane.

But the concessions to the Nationals are expected to take time to be delivered and some will not be confirmed until the mid-year budget update in December, the federal budget next year and possibly the federal election campaign.

Mr Pitt first rose to cabinet when one of Mr Joyce’s closest colleagues, Matt Canavan, quit the frontbench out of frustration with former leader Michael McCormack. He was dumped from cabinet when Mr Joyce returned to the Nationals’ leadership in June and promoted one of his supporters, Andrew Gee, to the senior rank.

 

The Nationals are confident of gaining changes to the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation to ease what they see as “green tape” on farmers and miners, sparking a likely fight in Parliament over the scale of the changes when Labor and the Greens want stronger checks on new projects.

 

More infrastructure spending will also be part of the final package, including support for an extension of the inland rail project being built from Melbourne to Brisbane.

But the concessions to the Nationals are expected to take time to be delivered and some will not be confirmed until the mid-year budget update in December, the federal budget next year and possibly the federal election campaign.

Mr Pitt first rose to cabinet when one of Mr Joyce’s closest colleagues, Matt Canavan, quit the frontbench out of frustration with former leader Michael McCormack. He was dumped from cabinet when Mr Joyce returned to the Nationals’ leadership in June and promoted one of his supporters, Andrew Gee, to the senior rank.

While the move gives the Nationals an additional seat in the inner circle of government, Liberal MPs appeared to accept the outcome as the “cost of doing business” when the important goal was government unity and a settlement on climate policy.

 

With both major parties promising a net zero target for 2050, the political debate in Parliament centred on Mr Morrison’s claim to exceed the government’s 2030 target while Labor is yet to decide whether it will set a new goal for that year.

Mr Taylor said the new measures would reflect his approach of using “technology not taxes” to reduce emissions, but the policy package is expected to include substantial spending of taxpayer funds, incurring debt when the government is forecasting budget deficits to continue beyond 2030.

 

Read more:

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/energy-spending-electric-cars-and-cleaner-fuel-in-coalition-s-emissions-plan-20211025-p592z3.html

 

 

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planet scomo goes zero...

Australia has joined the world in promising to make the nation carbon-neutral by 2050, ahead of a global climate change summit.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced on Tuesday the government's plan would see more than $20 billion invested in "low-emissions technologies", including carbon capture and storage, by 2030.

The plan also includes a "new priority" for the government to deliver "ultra-low-cost solar" power.

The latest projections show Australia is on track to cut emissions by 30 to 35 per cent by 2030.

However Mr Morrison said the formal target of a 26 to 28 per cent reduction would remain unchanged.

The plan comes after the Nationals confirmed they would give "in-principle" support to the target earlier this week, after lengthy negotiations.

As part of the deal to secure the Nationals support, the Productivity Commission will review the new plan every five years to measure the impact reducing emissions has on regional communities.

"That will monitor the impact, the socio-economic impact, of our plans into the future," Mr Morrison said.

"So I can say to rural and regional Australians this is a good plan for you. It's a good plan for all Australians."

More to come.

 

Read more:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-10-26/government-commits-to-net-zero-by-2050-climate-deal/100565254

 

Is this guy still on the same planet as the ScoMo that ridiculed electric cars at the previous election? How many times can a leopard change its spots? Can your gutter cat turn into a pedigreed siamese of the species with a flick of your local poodle parlour clipping unit? How many American consultants has ScoMo hired to tell him that his nuclear submarines will be supplied by the Brits? Should ScoMo help us with INDIVIDUAL battery storage so that we can go "off-grid"?

 

How good is that?

 

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a zero-value P-plan...

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has released his long awaited, capital-P“Plan” to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, and it contains (as anyone who has been paying attention could have predicted) no policy or strategy whatsoever. In this morning’s dispiriting press conference, it quickly became apparent that the government’s booklet-slideshow combo was nothing more than a vision board, peppered with meaningless symbols and slogans (“principles”) that you can expect to hear repeated nonstop between now and the next election. “The Plan is based on our existing policies,” the slides state, without a hint of shame, prompting one to wonder what exactly the PM has been grappling over so painfully with the Nationals these past two weeks. It contains no modelling, simply offering up unsubstantiated percentages proposing how much various categories will contribute to the goal, including the “Technology Investment Roadmap” (40 per cent), “Global technology trends” (15 per cent) and “Further technology breakthroughs” (15 per cent). It projects that Australia will “meet and beat” its dangerously lacklustre 2030 emissions target by achieving emissions cuts of up to 35 per cent, while still refusing to sign up to a more ambitious 2030 target. It was patently obvious to anyone listening that the government has no plans to do anything serious to drive towards net zero. But rather than acknowledge this, Morrison overcompensated by repeating the word “plan” ad nauseam, as if this would mean there actually was one. Grilled by journalists on when he would release modelling, costings or any of the things he continues to attack Labor over, Morrison waved away the requests, saying only “eventually”, before doubling down on the Opposition’s lack of a plan. It was, quite frankly, deeply unsettling to watch, with the Orwellian messaging made worse by the fact that we are talking about preventing apocalyptic warming of the Earth.

The newspeak continued in Question Time, where the PM waved printouts of his ridiculous slides around, talking up the “Plan” he had apparently set out “in great detail”, while accusing Labor of not having one. Asked by Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese for the cost of his plan, Morrison claimed the government was investing $20 billion in (questionable) low-emissions technologies, and accused Labor of only using taxes – as if that $20 billion isn’t made up of Australians’ taxes. “Isn’t it the case that instead of delivering a climate change policy after almost one decade in government, today the prime minister presented a 15-page slideshow [with] no new policy?” Albanese asked. “No,” the PM answered, before sitting down, his only direct answer of the entire afternoon. Debate surrounding whether the now supposedly bipartisan net-zero goal should be legislated prompted Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce to go on several rants against laws. “We wanted to make absolutely certain there was no legislation in there that enforced things,” he said. “We don’t believe in penalties. [Labor] believe in penalties, they believe the state reigns supreme over the individual, and we believe the individual rises above the state.” (“We believe in the inspiration of the individual and the smarts of the individual to rise above the enforcement of the Labor Party,” he later concluded.) Morrison, when asked whether he would be willing to support Labor’s policy for an electric car discount since he was now on board with net zero, offered up this strange pivot: “I don’t support Labor’s policy, they don’t have one, there is nothing to support!” (There is). His answer – along with his responses to every excruciating Dorothy Dixer – then dissolved into slogans, rambling about “technology not taxes” and “choices not mandates” in a truly nonsensical fashion that went far beyond the usual sloganeering.

At one point during Question Time, Joyce and former Nationals leader Michael McCormack were spotted peering at a phone together in the chamber – no doubt viewing a news.com.au report concerning a leaked blow-up in the Nationals group chat over a video where Senator Matt Canavan, appearing as the Terminator, promises to “terminate” the net-zero target. It says a lot that this was among the least farcical things to happen today. A later attempt by Labor to suspend the standing orders in order to call out the government’s flimsy plan and legislate net zero by 2050 failed, it goes without saying. But they hardly needed it to succeed.

No one was expecting much from today’s net-zero announcement, especially following the Nats’ public displays over the past month. But the ludicrousness of the “Plan” is far worse than anyone imagined, falling far below the lowest expectations of even the government’s strongest critics. Morrison’s choice to make a mockery of the net-zero target may just turn out to be a gift to the Opposition. With News Corp, the Business Council of Australia and the vast majority of the public on side, it seemed that perhaps all the Coalition had to do to neutralise the climate wars and wedge Labor on a 2030 target was present a reasonable and mature effort at aiming for net zero. But the government couldn’t resist taking the piss.

 

Read more:

https://www.themonthly.com.au/today/rachel-withers/2021/26/2021/1635224176/man-plan

 

 

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