Tuesday 29th of July 2014

not if everyone winks at once...

 

five eyes

Tony Abbott has defended the role of the Five Eyes intelligence-sharing alliance while on tour in North America, saying it should never apologise for “doing what’s necessary”, and confirmed he is hoping to meet Rupert Murdoch in New York.

The Australian leader has arrived in Canada to meet the country’s prime minister, Stephen Harper, a fellow conservative. Canada is part of the Five Eyes alliance along with Australia, England, New Zealand and the US. Abbott declared the US the “heavy lifter” of the group.

Revelations from the whistleblower Edward Snowden have raised controversy about the alliance's activities.

“Obviously we have to be intelligent about our intelligence. I mean that goes without saying, but the important thing is not to be deterred from doing what is necessary to protect our citizens, our interests and our values, and what is sometimes forgotten about the work of the Five Eyes is that it’s not just for the benefit of those five countries but it is ultimately for the benefit of the wider world,” Abbott told reporters in Ottawa when asked if Five Eyes should assess its spying practices.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/09/tony-abbott-defends-role-of-five-eyes-intelligence-alliance

 

keep your comments in your budgie smuggler, please......

Prime Minister Tony Abbott has called Russia a "bully" and demanded it stops "interfering" in Ukraine.

Mr Abbott's strongest comments on Russia to date came while he was in Ottawa, and followed Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper's criticisms of president Vladimir Putin.

Mr Harper described the Russian president as an "extreme nationalist" and "imperialist" who believes he has the "right and ability" to "invade" other countries.

"We're not at Hitleresque proportions but this is really disconcerting," Mr Harper told Canada's Global News. "This is a major power threatening global peace and security."

Mr Abbott backed the Canadian prime minister's comments.

"They're very forthright remarks and I think that they're perfectly appropriate remarks for the Canadian prime minister to make," Mr Abbott said.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-06-09/tony-abbott-tells-russia-to-stop-bullying-ukraine/5510280

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I suppose that Russia could say the same about the West: stop interfering with Ukraine... The West has been infiltrating Ukraine for more than ten years, trying to destroy the Russian/Ukraine long established alliance... Our Turd-in-Chief should stay out of what he has no idea about...

meanwhile in south australia...

 

How far does this government’s obsession with secrecy extend? And what’s the link between national security and a crass pre-election photo-op for the Prime Minister and South Australian Opposition Leader and failure-to-be Steven Marshall?

On March 13, the Prime Minister went to South Australia’s RAAF base Edinburgh to announce the acquisition of Triton drone aircraft, in the company of Air Marshal Geoff Brown. Entirely legitimate, of course  — indeed, where else but an RAAF base should such an announcement be made — and the Tritons will be based at Edinburgh. All good.

Except, immediately upon finishing the announcement, Abbott walked a few metres away inside the same hanger and then stood in front of a Liberal Party backdrop to re-announce the Triton purchase, with Steven Marshall, and then campaign for him.

“I’m pleased to be joined today by my South Australian colleague, the Leader, Steven Marshall and I am hopeful of being able to work constructively with Steven Marshall as premier after Saturday… Steven wants to work constructively with the Commonwealth; the incumbent Premier thinks that his role is to fight with the Commonwealth. Well I think the Australian people want better than that. I think the South Australian people want better than that.”

Is it appropriate to conduct party political events on RAAF bases? Labor Senator Stephen Conroy asked the Defence Minister, the apparently permanently enraged David Johnston, about it at estimates a fortnight ago. Johnston initially refused to even acknowledge that the visit had taken place, despite the transcript of the events being on the Prime Minister’s own website.

Conroy: Can you confirm that this event took place at the RAAF Base Edinburgh on 13 March, two days before the SA election?
Johnston: I most certainly cannot.
Conroy: Sorry, you cannot?
Johnston: I cannot.
Conroy: I wrote to you about this. I asked you questions in the past.
Johnston: I cannot confirm that this photograph is anywhere at all. I was not there. I do not know where the photograph is. Quite frankly, that should have been a very obvious answer to you.
Conroy: Can I go to the transcript of the Prime Minister’s press conference where he says: “It was terrific to arrive here at RAAF Base Edinburgh today in one of the Royal Australian Air Force’s Wedgetail aircraft.” Further in the same press conference on that day: “Here at RAAF Base Edinburgh we are basing, in the years to come, the Triton unmanned surveillance aircraft.” Does that assist you in your knowledge?
Johnston: Not one bit.

Fortunately, Air Marshal Brown was actually attending estimates, and was able to confirm that the event took place, and all took place in the one hanger. Defence Secretary Dennis Richardson explained that there were guidelines around the use of defence personnel for political purposes, but conducting partisan activities on military bases was OK if no military personnel were involved.

read more: http://www.crikey.com.au/2014/06/18/abbotts-top-secret-presser-national-security-or-stunt/

 

One could ask questions about who set up the theatre with backdrop for Tony to do his stunt at the base? Did they get permission? Who signed on the paperwork? Was it some defence personnel? No defence personnel involved? Rubbish.

 

And who is the David Johnston of the saga, a man who obviously is lying?... According to the merde-och press he is the glorious avid minister of defence who might buy some glorious submarines from the Japanese... We should be avidly impressed, but I'm not:

 

 

SEVENTY-TWO years after Japanese midget submarines attacked Sydney Harbour killing 21 sailors, Defence Minister David Johnston will today tour a Japanese submarine as a strong ally and potential buyer.

Senator Johnston will become the first ever Australian Defence Minister and the first minister from any foreign nation, to go aboard a Soryu (Blue Dragon) Class submarine serving with the Japanese Self Defence Force.

Australia and Japan are building much stronger defence ties and Senator Johnston, an avid submarine watcher, is keen to possibly include some of the cutting-edge Japanese technology in Australia’s next generation submarine.

don't read more at: http://www.news.com.au/technology/defence-minister-david-johnston-will-be-the-first-ever-australian-minister-to-inspect-a-japanese-submarine/story-e6frfrnr-1226952294048

 

 

a foot in both camps...

 

Jean-Claude Juncker, the next head of the European Commission, plans to implement a new digital strategy for the Continent. Europe, he believes, needs to become better equipped to defend itself from the US and Asia.

To the competition regulators in Brussels, Google has something akin to frequent flier status. Hardly a week goes by that an injured company doesn't deliver incriminating information about the Internet giant to the European Union capital.

The flood of complaints is coming from a growing number of markets where the company wasn't previously active. On June 11, Competition Commissioner Joaquín Almunia wrote a letter to his colleagues on the European Commission, the EU's executive, outlining some of these markets. The letter states that they include "social networks, video catalogue, streaming, mobile phone operating systems and apps." Among the latest complainants, the letter notes, is an advertising platform, the alliance of European photo agencies known as CEPIC, the Open Internet Project, which unites European publishers, and Deutsche Telekom. It can be safely predicted that Google's compliance with EU competition law will be closely monitored for a long time to come.

The competition commissioner claims the allegations are always in the same vein -- that Google is using its dominant position to force competitors out of an increasing number of markets. It's likely that Almunia will also have to tighten the conditions it is imposing on Google as part of current market abuse proceedings being conducted against the company. Almunia had wanted to end the proceedings by requiring the company to make relatively harmless concessions. Now, however, he writes to his fellow commissioners: "Once the comments from complainants are received during the summer, we will need to evaluate whether their arguments and evidence may justify a potential rethink of some aspects of the remedy."

It's not only the Spanish commissioner who appears to be waking up to the seemingly unstoppable advance of massive American Internet firms. In an essay recently published in the respected Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung newspaper, German Economics Minister Sigmar Gabriel, who is head of the center-left Social Democratic Party (SPD), wrote that people needed to stand up against the "brutal information capitalism." He argued "only the European Union has the power required to change the political course and rewrite the rules."

Jean-Claude Juncker, who was nominated as the next president of the European Commission at a turbulent summit in Brussels on Friday, shares this view. He wants to make the digital economy the focal point of his presidency. It is one issue on which he can count on support from David Cameron, despite the British prime minister's opposition to Juncker.

Part of Juncker's agenda will be to ensure that Europe challenges market abuse by American Internet giants with greater self-confidence. More important, however, will be for the EU to start cleaning up its own backyard.

Juncker wants to take advantage of a broad consensus among European politicians to put enough muscle in the EU's digital market that European companies can stand up to competition from the United States and Asia in the longer term. "We could create additional growth of €500 billion ($684 billion) and several hundred thousand jobs in Europe," the former Luxembourg prime minster says.

A European Industry in Decline

Juncker's team is currently hard at work drafting a new industrial policy in Brussels. "We will need to have the courage to break down national silos in telecommunications regulations, in copyright and data protection legislation, in the management of radio waves and in competition law," Juncker stated in his election campaign platform, setting the strategic direction.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/business/eu-wants-to-challenge-google-with-new-digital-strategy-a-978521.html

 

One of the MAJOR problems the Europeans have to address is the UK dithering. The UK has a foot in each camp... Its biggest foot is in the US camp. See toon and article above...