Tuesday 14th of August 2018

dear reader .....

Just a note to alert you that you can read the comments - without being registered. We won't even know who you are... although you will be counted. But a heartfelt thanks, even if you are just looking at the cartoons ... To be able to comment you will have to register but no one would have to know who you are, except the administrator of the site. Please note that this site is archived in the National Library of Australia in perpetuity. Just click on "recent comments" or on "read more" in the line below the cartoons to access some of the most fascinating and pertinent information there is from Australia and around the globe.

 

 

 

biden's bid...

biden

WASHINGTON (Sputnik) - Former Vice President Joe Biden would beat sitting President Donald Trump by seven points if he were to run for president in 2020, a new poll by Politico/ Morning Consult suggested on Tuesday.

a sick joke ...

a sick joke ...

on banksters ...

on banksters ...

engineering the future...

cogs

NOW IS THE FUTURE.

From Andre Vltchek

bolted...

bolted

One has to laugh about Andrew Bolt’s columns about the waves of immigrants that are "changing the landscape of Australia’s population". Born in Adelaide, South Australia, he himself was the son of newly arrived Dutch migrants... 

pollution and toxic blooms and water and fish and trouble..

fishy

In South Florida this summer, one ecological scourge has piled on top of another.

chuga chuga chuga chuga...

getting warmer...

Eight places in Portugal have broken local temperature records as a wave of heat from North Africa swept across the Iberian peninsula — and officials predicted the scorching temperatures could get even worse over the weekend.

I never planted them...

sunflower seeds

Remember these packets of sunflower seeds that were placed in our letterboxes to make us aware of Aung San Suu Kyi's plight? I never planted them... I was not convinced of the "next"...

try harder to screw your banks, says scomo...

sick banksick bank

Australia’s banking system has become so concentrated its major banks can pass on costs and set prices to boost profits without fear of losing market share, through every stage of the economic cycle, the Productivity Commission has found.

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